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In response to:

A Korean Nightmare

Doug3370 Wrote: Apr 08, 2013 11:28 AM
This is wrong both morally and tactically. Tactically, a few dozen H-bombs would not wipe NK off the map. A few hundred would, but we do not go to war to poison our allies, such as SK and Japan, with fallout. And after the war? The people of NK have been victims of the Kims for generations. Their efforts will be essential to rebuilding a liberated and unified Korea. If, that is, there's anyone to liberate and any point in reunification. You cannot liberate the dead and you cannot unite with them on any (ahem) viable terms. The war that may come, and we should pray it does not, will be winnable by means less cruel and extravagant than mass incineration of guilty and innocent alike.
In response to:

A Korean Nightmare

Doug3370 Wrote: Apr 08, 2013 11:23 AM
Rather optimistic, I'd say. I hate to be the pessimist, but Kim can read and so can his generals. With this piece, or without it, they will have figured out that their nuclear force cannot be kept waiting. If it is to be used, if it works at all, it will have to be used at once, as the opening salvo of the war. We can hope that it doesn't work, but they've tested and some of the test devices have worked. We can hope that our interceptors work, but we've tested and some of our interceptors miss. Things could go tragically ugly, just ten minutes into the war. We'd "win" anyhow, but there would be no heart for parades afterwards.
The currency has been inflating all along. A simple basic haircut cost 75 cents in 1960. Now, 50 some years later, it's more like 20 dollars. A gallon of gasoline cost 29 cents. Now, pushing 4 dollars. An ounce of gold? 35 dollars. Now, more like 1600 dollars. But that's not the whole story. Technology has boomed. A kwh of electricity will provide 5 or 10 times as much lighting as it did then. A gallon of gasoline will propel a car through more than twice as many miles. There is no need of silver emulsions to record x-ray images. No need of copper wire to carry telephone signals. Any single ordinary computer that you might be reading this message on has more computing power than was available, collectively, to the entire world in 1960.
A two percent cut will naturally lead to some furloughs. Like, two days out of every 100. To suggest that a two percent cut must mean a 20 percent cut in work hours? Laughable. The cuts in work hours are mostly for show.
Calling someone "unemployed" is just another label. Of course the correct way to refer to them is as an undocumented worker who currently has no job. A retiree is not a retiree, he is a person who used to have a job but decided to leave the labor force. It's wonderful! Where one word could serve, providing only a little work for the writer and none for the reader, now phrases pile up like guano, fertilizing the language and keeping us all busy decoding the duckspeak.
In response to:

After Obama

Doug3370 Wrote: Apr 04, 2013 11:40 AM
This country has gone over two centuries without any coup. Why expect one now? Neither the public nor the military would stand for it.
In response to:

After Obama

Doug3370 Wrote: Apr 04, 2013 11:39 AM
The planet's yearly weather is subject to influences other than CO2. While the planet may not have warmed over the last 15, if you zoom back to 25 or 50 years, the overall trend is visible. Add to this the fact that we're hitting dramatic new lows in summer Arctic sea ice extent, and it still looks as if the scientists are right. They've been right about the earth being round, about evolution, about a lot of things. And when they've been wrong, they've bowed to new evidence as it accumulated. We are learning how to make better wind and solar machinery. The cost is dropping. At some point, talk of "costly" green energy will become dated.
In response to:

Combat Global Warming: Be Gay for a Day

Doug3370 Wrote: Apr 02, 2013 10:48 AM
Why would you expect any sea level rise from a melting of the arctic sea ice? No one who knows that ice floats would. And guess what: scientists know, just as well as the general public, that ice floats. As to forest fires and volcanoes, well, forest fires are part of a cycle of growth and burning. The net result is that the carbon in trees is part of a back and forth between wood and atmospheric CO2. Nets out to zero. As to volcanoes, they're a real source of CO2 to the atmosphere, BUT not nearly as big nowadays as the coal-fired generators of China and the US. (In that order.)
In response to:

Combat Global Warming: Be Gay for a Day

Doug3370 Wrote: Apr 02, 2013 10:44 AM
An atom of carbon always has 6 protons and typically has 6 neutrons. Oxygen has 8 protons and typically 8 neutrons. So a molecule of CO2 masses very nearly 16+16+12 for every 12 that pure carbon masses. Gasoline is not pure carbon, of course, because the gasoline is composed of carbon and hydrogen. The hydrogen ends up in water molecules and does not contribute to CO2, but then again, it was so light that it contributed little to the mass of the gasoline in the first place.
In response to:

Combat Global Warming: Be Gay for a Day

Doug3370 Wrote: Apr 02, 2013 10:39 AM
Charlatans don't put in numbers for forest growth because in general forests are not growing. The North Slope of Alaska is gaining some bushes, but in the Amazon, logging is clearing larger areas of denser growth.
In response to:

Combat Global Warming: Be Gay for a Day

Doug3370 Wrote: Apr 02, 2013 10:36 AM
It so happens that farming is coming into its own in Greenland. On the narrow ice-free segments where they live, inhabitants are putting in vegetable gardens, getting the seedlings going indoors and then moving them outside for the brief-but-now-sufficient summer. Source, h t t p slash slash inhabitat dot com/gardeners-plant-strawberries-and-tomatoes-in-the-arctic-valleys-of-greenland-for-the-first-time/
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