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Mitt Romney blames election loss on Obama giving out free stuff to voters who would go on to vote for him. But doesn't the Republican party pander to evangelical Christians by giving welfare to Israel?
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Lebanon: Lessons from Two Assassinations

dircto Wrote: Nov 16, 2012 10:28 PM
Mitt Romney blames election loss on Obama giving out free stuff to voters who would go on to vote for him. But doesn't the Republican party pander to evangelical Christians by giving welfare to Israel?
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Who Fed Susan the Benghazi Bullhockey?

dircto Wrote: Nov 16, 2012 10:22 PM
When dupes of the Republican party say, "Just remember that Obama has added $4 trillion to the national debt since......." READ THE FREAKIN' US CONSTITUTION FOR PETE'S SAKE.
The annual budget for the Department of Veterans Affairs has more than doubled since 2003 to a requested $132 billion for fiscal 2012. That amount is expected to rise sharply over the next four decades as lingering health problems for veterans become more serious as they grow older. Costs for Vietnam veterans did not peak until 30 or 40 years after the end of the war, according to the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments. “We will have a vast overhang in domestic costs for caring for the wounded and covering retirement expenditure of the war fighters,” said Loren Thompson, a policy expert with the Lexington Institute. “The U.S. will continue to incur major costs for decades to come.”
Caring for veterans, more than 2 million of them, could alone reach $1 trillion, according to Paul Rieckhoff, executive director of the Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America, in Congressional testimony in July. More than 32,000 soldiers were wounded in Iraq, according to the U.S. Department of Defense. Altogether, the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan could cost the U.S. between $4 trillion and $6 trillion. The U.S. has already spent $2 trillion on the wars after including debt interest and the higher cost of veterans’ disabilities.
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Who Fed Susan the Benghazi Bullhockey?

dircto Wrote: Nov 16, 2012 10:15 PM
The annual budget for the Department of Veterans Affairs has more than doubled since 2003 to a requested $132 billion for fiscal 2012. That amount is expected to rise sharply over the next four decades as lingering health problems for veterans become more serious as they grow older. Costs for Vietnam veterans did not peak until 30 or 40 years after the end of the war, according to the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments. “We will have a vast overhang in domestic costs for caring for the wounded and covering retirement expenditure of the war fighters,” said Loren Thompson, a policy expert with the Lexington Institute. “The U.S. will continue to incur major costs for decades to come.”
In response to:

Who Fed Susan the Benghazi Bullhockey?

dircto Wrote: Nov 16, 2012 10:15 PM
Caring for veterans, more than 2 million of them, could alone reach $1 trillion, according to Paul Rieckhoff, executive director of the Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America, in Congressional testimony in July. More than 32,000 soldiers were wounded in Iraq, according to the U.S. Department of Defense. Altogether, the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan could cost the U.S. between $4 trillion and $6 trillion. The U.S. has already spent $2 trillion on the wars after including debt interest and the higher cost of veterans’ disabilities.
In response to:

Who Fed Susan the Benghazi Bullhockey?

dircto Wrote: Nov 16, 2012 10:14 PM
Those costs include interest payments on the billions borrowed to fund the war; the cost of maintaining military bases in Kuwait, Qatar and Bahrain to defend Iraq or reoccupy the country if the Baghdad government unravels; and the expense of using private security contractors to protect U.S. property in the country and to train Iraqi forces.
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Who Fed Susan the Benghazi Bullhockey?

dircto Wrote: Nov 16, 2012 10:14 PM
Over a 50-year period, that comes to $80 billion annually. Near the start of the war, the U.S. Defense Department estimated the war would cost $50 billion to $80 billion. White House economic adviser Lawrence Lindsey was dismissed in 2002 after suggesting the price of invading and occupying Iraq could reach $200 billion. “The direct costs for the war were about $800 billion, but the indirect costs, the costs you can’t easily see, that payoff will outlast you and me,” said Lawrence Korb, a senior fellow at American Progress, a Washington, D.C. think tank, and a former assistant secretary of defense under Ronald Reagan.
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Who Fed Susan the Benghazi Bullhockey?

dircto Wrote: Nov 16, 2012 10:14 PM
Iraq war ends with a $4 trillion IOU-Veterans’ health care costs to rise sharply over the next 40 years http://www.marketwatch.com/story/iraq-war-ends-with-a-4-trillion-iou-2011-12-15 The nine-year-old Iraq war came to an official end late 2011, but paying for it will continue for decades until U.S. taxpayers have shelled out an estimated $4 trillion.
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Duck Soup

dircto Wrote: Nov 16, 2012 10:14 PM
The annual budget for the Department of Veterans Affairs has more than doubled since 2003 to a requested $132 billion for fiscal 2012. That amount is expected to rise sharply over the next four decades as lingering health problems for veterans become more serious as they grow older. Costs for Vietnam veterans did not peak until 30 or 40 years after the end of the war, according to the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments. “We will have a vast overhang in domestic costs for caring for the wounded and covering retirement expenditure of the war fighters,” said Loren Thompson, a policy expert with the Lexington Institute. “The U.S. will continue to incur major costs for decades to come.”
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