In response to:

Can a Muslim Lead the Christian Campus Club?

DHE Wrote: Apr 06, 2012 12:46 PM
I find this a very difficult question. State schools are state schools, arms of the state. They are not religious institutions. While there is no reason that a club recognized or funded by the school could not have a religious affiliation or title, it cannot be a church or religious group in the usual sense. In most cases, students are not going to join a group they don't have a reason to belong to or where they are not wanted, and the club can do as it like. But, there might be times when some students do decide to do that, and, hypothetically, those students could take over the club and, essentially, destroy it. That would possibly lead to others doing the same, and it could get ugly. But, since it is a school club, that is the way . . .
DHE Wrote: Apr 06, 2012 12:59 PM
it has to go. In the end, we get along or prevail as a culture because of how we treat each other aside from being forced to do so by the law. If people are going to do as the author fears, and it is not inconceivable - probably likely sometimes, someplace, it will still be legal, but not very nice and destructive. There might be a chess club, for instance, taken over by those who don't know how to play. Too bad. This is a risk we face in our system, just as we must listen to offensive speech, in order to protect all speech. Nothing stops those students from having any association they want outside of the state's auspices and doing it anyway they want. It is, conservatives should not need to be reminded, a utopia.
DHE Wrote: Apr 06, 2012 1:33 PM
Of course, I meant, not a utopia.

If we follow the logic of the Supreme Court, a Muslim could lead the Intervarsity Christian Fellowship club on your local campus. As absurd as this sounds, it is the very real, potential outcome of some recent Court rulings, and it is in keeping with the decisions made independently by a number of colleges and universities.

In June, 2010, the Supreme Court ruled 5-4 that the “University of California’s Hastings College of the Law acted reasonably, and in a viewpoint-neutral manner, in refusing to officially recognize and give funds to a campus chapter of the Christian Legal Society because...