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It would be a legal nightmare.
Hmm. This is the reason that Jewish Kibbutzes failed to produce grown-ups who married each other. Being together from an early age triggers the 'like a sister or brother' response, which tends to reduce interest as though the relationship were incestuous. Without that, our tendency to prefer mates similar to us might make things awkward. Yet another (though odd) reason to keep your family close.
In response to:

The Jihadist Next Door

Dean197 Wrote: Jan 20, 2015 11:07 AM
Taqiyya is a Shi'a thing, but most of our troubles come from Suni Salafists. There are reasons why we never hear of Ahmadi terrorists, Ismaili terrorists, Ibahdi terrorists, or universal Sufi terrorists. They're all Muslims, but the differences among them are as significant as the differences among Christians.
In response to:

The Jihadist Next Door

Dean197 Wrote: Jan 20, 2015 11:01 AM
I wish we would stop calling them 'jihadists'. It's like calling them 'crusaders' it doesn't sound bad to Arabic-speaking ears, it sounds noble. We might as well be calling them 'superheroes'. The Arabic word for 'terrorist' is 'irhabi', so they should be called irhabis or irhabists.
People's votes should be informed by their values. But long-term result of official political activism of the Christian Right at the level that began in the early eighties seems to be younger people leaving their denominations in droves. In the eyes of many, churches seem to have become more about political influence than leading people to Christ. The results may have been more to their liking if they had kept their eyes on the prize more than on the polls.
That's not actually going to happen. Muslims are less than 3% of the population of the US, no Muslim country exists within 500 miles of our borders, and we have plenty of Catholics just waiting to move here should we come to feel the percentage of Muslims is getting out of hand. The demographics just don't support the idea that they're going to take over our country. Especially Atlanta.
Can you cite an example of an employee of a city or town or state writing a book calling Christians vile and perverse? You say it happens all the time, but I'm not aware of it ever happening. People who write such things tend to be self-employed or work for media companies that understandably prioritize freedom of expression in comparison to, say, a municipality or insurance company. My contract is clear that my continued employment depends on me not doing anything that reflects badly on the company for which I work.
In response to:

Rand Paul’s Cluelessness on Cuba

Dean197 Wrote: Dec 29, 2014 10:23 AM
Embargoes in general have not been very useful in achieving our policy goals. The best (and probably only) way to get our money back is to exploit Cuba economically, whiich is exactly what our own embargo is preventing us from doing. American entrepeneurs will swoop down on Cuba like flies to sugar, and the best part is that the Cuban people will be better off for Amerca making money off of them.
In response to:

Rand Paul’s Cluelessness on Cuba

Dean197 Wrote: Dec 29, 2014 10:18 AM
Dictators depend on tight control of the information their people receive. Embargoes don't hurt them because they can then blame all the country's problems on the embargo. There's no reason why we should have more hostile relations with Cuba than we have with North Korea.
In response to:

Rand Paul’s Cluelessness on Cuba

Dean197 Wrote: Dec 29, 2014 10:14 AM
'We're tired of oppressing your economy without ever getting the results it's intended to yield' isn't surrender. The Cold War is over, the embargo should have ended decades ago.
In response to:

Rand Paul’s Cluelessness on Cuba

Dean197 Wrote: Dec 29, 2014 10:11 AM
The GOP is heading toward a break between the neocons and social conservatives and 'liberty Republicans'. There's no escaping the dominant force in American politics becoming Generation X.
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