In response to:

Environmentalism and Human Sacrifice

Dave3678 Wrote: Feb 26, 2013 4:15 PM
Thank you, Mr. Prager, for this article. This is the best article I've ever seen explaining what is wrong with the environmentalist movement. The human life is sacred. Mosquito life is not. My son is entering college this fall, and, if that's not scary enough, he wants to be an environmental lawyer. My biggest fear is that he goes off the liberal deep end like the folks you depict. I will save this article for him to read at an appropriate time. (Right now, he's too anti-Dad to take this article seriously.) Thanks again.
Antipas Metochos Wrote: Feb 26, 2013 4:29 PM
If I may, Dave3678, recommend a few more resources for both you and your son. You might be interested in Robert Zubrin's "Merchants of Despair: Radical Environmentalists, Criminal Pseudo-Scientists, and the Fatal Cult of Antihumanism (New York: New Atlantis, 2012). Your son might be interested in two YouTube videos: (www.youtube.com/watch?v=PdLReIes8Q8 [Lord Christopher Monckton explaining today's "environmentalists"] and www.youtube.com/watch?v=xHrb6TLmrDM [environmentalists worshipping the trees, rocks, etc. after cashing their government grant checks]). Have fun!
Richard31 Wrote: Feb 26, 2013 11:06 PM
Too serious, Antipas... You know what got through to mine? Penn & Teller. (Warning, they do not moderate their language in the slightest.)
rmccarthy Wrote: Feb 26, 2013 11:29 PM
While I do not completely agree with Penn & Teller, I do respect Penn and enjoy their schtick. Much of what they present is informative and interesting.

Last week, Bjorn Lomborg, the widely published Danish professor and director of one of the world's leading environmental think tanks, the Copenhagen Consensus Center, published an article about the Philippines' decision, after 12 years, to allow genetically modified (GM) rice -- "golden rice" -- to be grown and consumed in that country.

The reason for the delay was environmentalist opposition to GM rice; and the reason for the change in Philippine policy was that 4.4 million Filipino children suffer from vitamin A deficiency. That deficiency, Lomborg writes, "according to the World Health Organization, causes 250,000 to 500,000 children to go blind...