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this isnt to say you cant still help them with their further education it would be a great gift to them if they are capable of college level work but dont let the colleges/universities assume your assets are available for raiding!
20 years ago I practically begged my parents to stop covering me on their insurance and claiming me as a dependent on their tax returns. by giving up that 1000/year deduction they could have eliminated the university's assertion that they should be paying 6000/year towards my tuition (the family farm never profited more than 35K a year and there were 4 of us simultaneously in college during those years, with each institution wanting 5-6K from my parents) the insurance would have been the toughest piece to give up, if only this country would allow insurers to offer high deductible coverage for hospitalization a very reasonable plan could bridge the 18-early 30s window stop saving for their education, cut the cord
Algebra, at the most basic level solving for X, and later Geometry (in particular logic and show-your-work-proofs) really provide the fundamental critical thinking skills that are so desperately need for both college and the workforce. These thought processes, when combined with reading comprehension and composition (expression of ideas and development of arguments) form the foundation for post-secondary education success.
You hit the nail on the head. If you want to request federal aid and disaster relief, there is no problem in that and I expect the Congress to do their job and consider the request. But if the bill doesnt come to the floor or gets voted down, dont whine that NJ is being ignored... sieze the opportunity to highlight the business as usual attitude and shameless attachment of unrelated riders to serious bills, not cry that Republicans are mean and heartless.
In response to:

On Business Dave Says

conservative_librarian Wrote: Jan 03, 2013 9:46 AM
Jim needs to work on his reading comprehension. Dave specifically used the IRS definition, if you have an issue with 'his opinion' then take it up with the IRS. With regard to the solar panel industry, Volt etc... you are not properly applying the term profit. A profit is only having greater receipts than expenses over a calendar year. Sure the income generated from purchases of Volts of panels doesnt directly cover the costs, but (sales + subsidies) - expenses = PROFITS
While it is imperative that the United States implement a sound currency and budgetary model, I am thoroughly unconvinced that a return to a 'precious' metals backed currency is the best way to accomplish this. The proposals that have been of greatest interest to me focus on an energy backed currency. One means of implementation can be examined here http://energybackedmoney.com... Chapter 7 I think provides a very concise overview. Another website that frequently analyzes how an energy backed currency might be implemented is at http://eddiesblogonenergyandphysics.blogspot.com/ . Two articles I found very informative were http://eddiesblogonenergyandphysics.blogspot.com/2012/01/relationship-between-energy-et-and.html http://eddiesblog
If the TH staff are unwilling (or just cant figure out how) to outright block the spammers, they could at least provide a way for us to filter them from view (suppress by username for instance)
PNAS is actually a publisher at the forefront of making scholarly articles more accessible. They were an early adopter of a model to make all historic content available for free, and new content is made free after a 6month embargo. While it might be preferable to have it made available immediately, it is a model that is sustainable and a huge improvement over the commercial publishers like Elsevier/Blackwell/etc Most scholarly publishing is funded in some part by government grants (NIH/DARPA/NSF/etc), and while most research reported in PNAS probably is federally funded, to my knowledge it isnt itself a funding agent nor an exclusive instrument for publishing funded research.
In response to:

A Vast Moral Difference

conservative_librarian Wrote: Nov 23, 2012 4:42 PM
while I hesitate to feed the trolls, the answer to this is so simple and instructive it may benefit others to answer. the Medicare Part D plan that was passed by the Republican congress can be best understood as a compromise, you know that thing that the progressives say the republicans never do the progressive alternative was projected to be 40% LARGER (and of course the bill as passed has far outstripped the initial costs projected by the CBO) even the smaller bill signed by the Republican congress would find little support among fiscal conservatives who read this site, but progressives cant hang it as a huge expense on the Republicans when their won proposal would have cost substantially more
In response to:

The Best Solution

conservative_librarian Wrote: Nov 19, 2012 2:11 PM
I completely agree, the sooner we throw the 'wealthy' under the bus for expediency the better. While the rule-of-law would be further eroded, revenues would likely drop, the economy further slow, and Obama would get to crow over his class warfare success... at least there wouldnt be gridlock.
a more valuable comparison would look directly at inflation over that time period or more specifically at CPI Using these two common metrics, 10cents in 1959 compares to somewhere between 75cents and 90cents in 2010
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