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Christianity is Compatible with Ayn Rand

Charles41 Wrote: Sep 10, 2012 3:37 PM
False dichotomy, they don't want to loose their life. They are not condemned because they have wealth.
Charles41 Wrote: Sep 10, 2012 4:57 PM
One further thing here, Jesus said "Keep your treasure in heaven, for where your treasure is, there will your heart be also." The profit motive is not greed. Greed values money over God. The profit motive is a fact of created human nature.
Charles41 Wrote: Sep 10, 2012 4:29 PM
You battle on jwillliams. Your doing fine. How does one get forty years of experience?
The article is not written from a Christian world view. Our job is to point people to the real truth.
Ron-CA Wrote: Sep 10, 2012 4:22 PM
Context is very important in interpreting scripture. Jews believed that a wealthy person had become wealthy because they were blessed by God. Jesus turns the tables on them saying it is not about the money but about your heart. In the passage just prior to this (Matthew 19:16-22) Jesus has the discussion with the rich young ruler who thinks his actions alone will get him into heaven, but when Jesus tells him to turn away from his money he cannot and goes away dejected. This is what Jesus responding to in his teaching in Mt 19:22)
jwilliams Wrote: Sep 10, 2012 4:14 PM
I more or less agree with you, then. My issue is with the article trying to say Rand and Christianity are compatible. Also, sorry about the triple-post. Browsers will be browsers.
1Falcon1 Wrote: Sep 10, 2012 4:14 PM
not all just what the poor need
1Falcon1 Wrote: Sep 10, 2012 4:13 PM
i just did dolt read it, the comparision is to rich people "BUYING" their way into heaven
Charles41 Wrote: Sep 10, 2012 4:10 PM
About the last thing I want to do is be compatible with Rand. Rand is only right in as much as she is compatible with God. Even a busted clock is right twice a day. What I want to do is be dead on right with the truth.
jwilliams Wrote: Sep 10, 2012 4:04 PM
I do see your interpretation, but I still don't see it as compatible with Rand. Even if Jesus isn't saying you have to give up everything you own and give to the poor to inherit the kingdom, he still seems to recommend that as a good course of action. No one who's read Rand could think she'd have anything but contempt for that notion.
jwilliams Wrote: Sep 10, 2012 4:01 PM
I honestly can see your interpretation, but I still don't see how it's capitalistic. Jesus still seems to be advocating giving up all your possessions and giving to the poor. Perhaps it is not the only way to get into Heaven, but no one who's read Rand could think she would have anything but disdain for that notion.
jwilliams Wrote: Sep 10, 2012 4:01 PM
I honestly can see your interpretation, but I still don't see how it's capitalistic. Jesus still seems to be advocating giving up all your possessions and giving to the poor. Perhaps it is not the only way to get into Heaven, but no one who's read Rand could think she would have anything but disdain for that notion.
Charles41 Wrote: Sep 10, 2012 3:48 PM
With God all things are possible if you read on. If you check out all the context Jesus had compassion on the "rich young ruler" , after all the man ran up to him intent on securing eternal life. But when faced with giving up his wealth he balked. It's not the having it that stopped him, his trust was in it. Have you given all your money to the poor? Is that the standard? Can you enter by your works?
jwilliams Wrote: Sep 10, 2012 3:40 PM
Where's the false dichotomy? Matthew 19:24 says in no uncertain terms that it is almost impossible for rich people to get into Heaven. If I am misinterpreting the passage, please explain what is wrong my interpretation. It seems pretty straightforward to me.

Increasingly, priests and pastors are preaching that socialism (in the name of “social justice”) is Christ-like. In truth, capitalism, not socialism, reflects Christian values. I think Christians would be less likely to embrace socialism if they understood that the economic philosophy of Ayn Rand is compatible with Christianity.

‘Social Justice’ Evolves

In the Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle speaks of a general form of justice that encompasses all virtue. Describing general justice, Aristotle writes: “It is complete virtue and excellence in the fullest sense… It is complete because he who possesses it can make use of his virtue not only by himself but...