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In response to:

My Apology to Mormon Readers

AskthisMormon Wrote: Jun 05, 2013 1:31 PM
Please recall that when Joseph Smith received his first vision, his life was a product of early protestant America, as were most of the early Saints. These communities were not, nor were their religious leaders, as pure as they would have had you believe. To say that Joseph Smith and the early leaders of the Church were dirty against a backdrop of a pure, non-adulterous Christian America, would be disingenuous. In early America, there were Christian teachings. Then there were how people lived. There was often a huge gulf between the two. To some extent, that is a battle that still goes on in America today.
In response to:

My Apology to Mormon Readers

AskthisMormon Wrote: Jun 05, 2013 1:30 PM
But Joseph Smith himself did not enjoy the blessing of generations of traditions, teachings, and ideals that his antecedents were beneficiaries of. I submit that part of our longevity in relationships now, in the modern Church, has to do with the tutelage of living under polygamous conditions over a century ago. We are not so romantic as to not recognize the pain and problems inherent in polygamy. In any room in which there are a diverse group of people, Mormons are usually the first to speak against polygamy.
In response to:

My Apology to Mormon Readers

AskthisMormon Wrote: Jun 05, 2013 1:30 PM
This is one of the most interesting apologies I have ever read. Many of your statements are inaccurate and can be rectified by checking out the website FAIR and some of the comments below. Keep in mind that Mormon men today embrace monogamy. The current prophet, Thomas S. Monson, and most of his predecessors, live a virtuous life, faithful to one wife. And so do most Mormon men. How so? How is it that Mormons enjoy a very low divorce rate now? Most of us claim it has to do with the restoration of the gospel, and the doctrine and teachings introduced by Joseph Smith.
Make no mistake: the antagonists faith (any faith) have their own religious loyalty to A-theism. It is its own religion. With its own articles of faith, its own sacred texts, its own high priests. The problem is that the proponents of A-theism want their "religion" to be the only one. Last I checked, we don't have a state religion.
True: he is emboldened to do this, but ask him to do the same thing with a wiccan symbol or Allah and I bet all of a sudden that prof is too afraid to do it.
Kimberly: How can you say the creator of the universe does not think this is a big deal?
I would have to say that most active Latter-day Saints (Mormons) would have responded the same way this student chose to respond, as would most Christians who believe in their faith. It is a gross atrocity, and when the academic structure refuses to recant, it really exposes the sickness in academia these days... When the outlying government does nothing to preserve his rights, not the university, not a local or federal judicial setting, then you know this civilization has met its demise.
Lois, Ask any bishop of any ward how many members of the congregation, members of the specific ward pay tithing. There are members of the Church who do not. They are not kicked out into the street. Many of them hold callings and positions of importance. I'm sure since the economic downturn, it is increasingly difficult for people to pay tithing. But many do out of faith, and , as in my life, feel that we are blessed for it. Mormons who choose not to pay tithing can still be Mormons.. It is 100% voluntary.
Lois: "Mormons are required by Commandment of God to pay 10% of all their GROSS income to the LDS church. This includes all income - including: employment, unemployment insurance, student loans, pell grant checks, Social Security income, Medicare, foodstamps, trust funds and any other form of income, even including finding money on the ground. If they miss paying tithing for any reason while alive - they will jeopardize their eternal salvation."
Fast offerings are completely voluntary. Encouraged, yes. Required, no.
Actually, we are encouraged to tithe, which is somewhat different than required. You can be a Mormon and not pay tithing. Fast offerings, which are set aside for the poor (we fast and then donate the equivalent -- or more if we can--- to feed and clothe the poor, either in our own congregation or elsewhere in the world.
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