In response to:

No, Weed Isn't "Harmless"

Anonymous908 Wrote: Nov 28, 2012 12:56 PM
I work within the "system" unfortunately. People usually don't go to prison for a MJ charge alone. However, people in the process of getting out have to go through probation or parole inwhich they live in the community but still do UA's. Former convicts are pulled from productive jobs and put back in prison or jail because of a hot UA for Marijuana. This happens A LOT. This is where we waste TONS of tax payer money. This is one reason criminals have such a hard time reintegrating back into communities. Stupid little beurocratic rules. It is there fault for smoking while on probation, don't get me wrong. It is a very stupid idea and they are playing with their own freedom. But we waste lots of doe on the marijuana issue, needlessly.
SMyles Wrote: Nov 28, 2012 4:02 PM
" they are playing with their own freedom." Uh, who's playing with their freedom?
nawlins72 Wrote: Nov 28, 2012 5:51 PM
SMyles, don't you understand, they broke the law and must be punished. Don't question if the law is just or unjust, it is the law and all must submit.
Anominus Wrote: Nov 28, 2012 1:03 PM
I also work within the system. Probationers and parolees are also considered to have violated the terms of their release if they drink alcohol. Is that also a waste of "TONS of tax payer money"?

The reason many criminal have a hard time reintegrating is because: a) the culture - many of them simply aren't interested in reforming themselves as they blame everyone else for their problems; and b) because they have betrayed the trust of society and people aren't exactly interested in welcoming them back. Besides, the justice system is not there to "reintegrate" or "reform" criminals - it is there to apply the law, punish crime and restore the victims.
nawlins72 Wrote: Nov 28, 2012 5:54 PM
"Probationers and parolees are also considered to have violated the terms of their release if they drink alcohol. Is that also a waste of "TONS of tax payer money"?"

Yes.

"Besides, the justice system is not there to "reintegrate" or "reform" criminals - it is there to apply the law, punish crime and restore the victims."

In the case of possession and use of drugs, WHAT VICTIMS? Draining the finances of the convict and his family is restitution?
Anominus Wrote: Nov 28, 2012 6:16 PM
Wow, so we shouldn't hold people accountable for violating the conditions they agree to? And you wonder why people have such a low opinion of "libertarians." You are no better than an anarchist.

What victims? The people injured in DUI's, or drug filled domestic violence, or robbery to fund the next drug purchase, etc. I've worked with these people before, the harm they do to themselves and the people around them is proof enough that there is no justification for legalization recreational drugs.
Anominus Wrote: Nov 28, 2012 6:25 PM
Yeah, it's so incredibly "dumb" that people who have trouble staying within the bounds of the law should possibly avoid substances which inhibit self-control. What on earth were they thinking when they came up with that law?

Words to describe your brand of stupidity fail me...
nawlins72 Wrote: Nov 28, 2012 6:35 PM
"What victims? The people injured in DUI's, or drug filled domestic violence, or robbery to fund the next drug purchase, etc."

Typical dishonest, Anominus. You dodged my question, which SPECIFICALLY discussed the "case of possession and use", not DUI's or assault or robbery. In those cases, WHAT VICTIMS?

"I've worked with these people before, the harm they do to themselves and the people around them is proof enough that there is no justification for legalization recreational drugs."

Yes, your solution of destroying their lives and that of their families through financial ruin in the courts and prisons is working like a charm.
Anominus Wrote: Nov 28, 2012 6:42 PM
I read through a goodly number of the criminal complaints and indictments that come through the court. Very few of them had only "possession and use" as the sole charges. The most common reasons for arrest and criminal charges were typically DUI, domestic violence or public disturbance, after which there's mandatory drug testing which reveals the drug use.

You can argue the justice of the punishment as much as you like, but that is the law at the moment - violate it and pay the consequences.
nawlins72 Wrote: Nov 28, 2012 6:53 PM
Your anecdotal evidence is not compelling.

http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2012/10/29/americas-2011-drug-war-tally-one-marijuana-arrest-every-42-seconds/
Anominus Wrote: Nov 28, 2012 7:01 PM
And yet that doesn't tell you the amounts that were possessed. I guess that's not important... You are a joke. I think I'm done here. It's too hard to try to get facts through the cloud of marijuana smoke you travel in.
nawlins72 Wrote: Nov 28, 2012 7:05 PM
HAHAHAHA!!! Keep dodging, Anominus. First, possession arrests are a tiny fraction, then when the evidence shows you are wrong, it's "yeah, but how much did they have".

You are done here.

Our friend Steven Crowder recently took a trip to Ann Arbor, Michigan to expose a common lie about Marijuana use: it's not harmful. It turns out, Marijuana isn't "just a plant" that does less damage than alcohol. According to a doctor Crowder interviewed in the video below, Marijuana actually lingers in your brain and when smoked at a young age, prevents maturity from taking place (imagine that!).

 

As Crowder pointed out in the video, there are many cases to be made on both sides of the Marijuana legalization...