In response to:

When Not Tying the Knot Is Not Good

anonymous5936 Wrote: Mar 22, 2013 9:54 AM
Many women today do feel a sense of satisfaction in raising their children in a safe, loving environment. I know I did. The main problem with full-time mothers is that men have never given any appreciation to them or for the work they do. In the past, when nearly every mother worked in the home, they were considered lazy, stupid and worthless because they had no income. Women had no rights and were the legal property of their husbands. They weren't even considered human. The only reason any woman has any rights today is because of the large number of working women. Money is freedom. Men will never put their family before money and that is where the conflict lies.
Joseph64 Wrote: Mar 22, 2013 4:41 PM
BS! Absolutely none of the nonsense you just spouted was ever true in this country.
Joseph64 Wrote: Mar 22, 2013 4:41 PM
BS! Absolutely none of the nonsense you just spouted was ever true in this country.
Denise67 Wrote: Mar 22, 2013 3:19 PM
labor market, a woman's ability to re-marry DECREASES with time. When she reaches middle age, she is less attractive to men. That also makes her especially vulnerable in divorce. The time she has spent in full-time homemaking -- the years that have inevitably passed -- mean that it is hard to find another man to whom to act as a housewife.
The answer isn't to get rid of this occupation but to recognize its special vulnerabilities and put in economic protections.
Denise67 Wrote: Mar 22, 2013 3:17 PM
Farrell doesn't deal with the special problems of housewives. His excellent book shows why we do not -- and never have -- lived in a "man's world" or patriarchy.
It is my own observation that the isolation of the housewife is linked to suburbanization and can be addressed by apartment and similar dwelling. When anyone, man or woman, is outside the paid labor market, the value of that person's labor in the paid labor market decreases drastically. This is what makes a housewife so very vulnerable in case of a divorce. She can't just pick up where she left off. Thus, we need to ensure solid protections are in place so being a housewife doesn't lead to destitution. While the value of a person often increases with time and seniority in the paid
Scott1205 Wrote: Mar 22, 2013 3:03 PM
I've always said that every individual needs to have skills to support themselves, and being solely a housewife definitely leaves a woman vulnerable. I once explained this to a female friend who just wanted to "get married and stay at home with the kids". It's why all women should be capable of supporting themselves, and should the couple decide that she become a housewife, she should at least work until they decide to have kids. Does the isolation factor exist because most women now work or did it exsist before? Does Farrell say?
Scott1205 Wrote: Mar 22, 2013 2:53 PM
She was one of the wisest women I've known, she had a great talent for telling stories. You've also bought the idea that ad degree from our current dumbed down education system means you're intelligent. It doesn't. I come across many a stupid person who have degrees and even advanced degrees.
Scott1205 Wrote: Mar 22, 2013 2:46 PM
You are swallowing the Femi-Nazi narrative hook line and sinker. Women had equal rights long before they entered the work force in significant numbers. They have to denigrate the contibutions of homemakers so that it can fit their narrative. Housewives were the glue of the community, we are poorer as a nation because we don't have them gettign to know one another in our neighborhoods and keeping our kids out of trouble. My Grandmother was a stay at home mother who occasionally worked (cleaning, sewing, baking, etc) to bring in extra money and only had a 3rd grade education, my Grandfather (who passed before I was born) only had a 7th grade education. I know my father and I never thought of her as stupid, lazy or worthless.
Denise67 Wrote: Mar 22, 2013 2:23 PM
The best book on this subject is "The Myth of Male Power" by Warren Farrell. It is a real eye-opener. There ARE special problems with housewifery. Suburbanization meant housewives tended to be isolated from adult company. I believe returning to apartments or more families in condominiums will address this. Housewife is not a uniquely oppressive occupation. However, it is a VULNERABLE occupation. A divorce can leave a housewife economically devastated. We shouldn't try to wipe out the occupation but to address problems such as isolation and economic vulnerability.
Terminus in WA Wrote: Mar 22, 2013 11:41 AM
"The only reason any woman has any rights today is because of the large number of working women. Money is freedom. Men will never put their family before money and that is where the conflict lies."

Really? Men (all of them?) will never (no exceptions?) put their family before money? You have very low view of men. And the converse is that women will always put family before money, I presume. You have a very hyperbolic, dichotomous view of the sexes. Have you ever read any of Christina Hoff Summers' work on gender issues? It may give you some balance.

We pay outsize attention to women at the top, about whether they lean in or lean back, about whether they act like men and even about whether they act like women. After decades of feminism's telling women they can control their own destiny, scoring a seat on the fast-moving monorail to success is finally possible. But the seats are restricted. That's why so many women are so angry at Marissa Mayer, the CEO of Yahoo, who built a nursery next to her office for her baby but insists that her staff members, mothers included, leave their children behind and work at...