In response to:

Racial Divide Worse Under Obama

Alvin24 Wrote: Nov 05, 2012 7:00 AM
Read this article by this idiot. I'm a black conservative and everytime I go into the barbershop I'm bombarded by foolishness like this. http://www.eurthisnthat.com/2009/08/28/andrew-m-manis-asks-when-are-we-white-people-going-to-get-over-it/ This is typical White Liberal garbage and it has a tremendous effect on uninformed black people.
SteveL2 Wrote: Nov 05, 2012 12:56 PM
When I was a young child going to kindergarten and first grade, my best friend was black. We were so close, we were like brothers. We didn't think about race at all, not at all. I don't think I even paid attention to the fact that his skin color was much darker than mine.

I think most young kids are like that. But later on they pick up racial tensions from their parents and from politicians. I wish adults would stop insisting that young children grow up to fight the same battles the adults fought.

The Civil Rights struggle was a success. But for the older generation of black leaders like Ben Jealous of the NAACP, even in the 21st century, every day is still Bull Connor and the KKK, without end.
coveyrise Wrote: Nov 05, 2012 7:35 AM
Yes Alvin. I never stop being amazed by White Liberals who think they can walk in the shoes of an American Black Man. I'm a White guy who was raised by Black Nanny and I didn't realize anyone cared about skin color till I as in 2nd or 3rd grade, but I cannot ligitimately speak for any Black American so I don't try. White Liberals on the other hand pretend that they are going to heal a racial divide while stirring the pot to continue it. Black Americans are capable of speaking for themselves and they don't need a bunch of Self Appointed White Saints to do it for them.

The headline of a recent article by the Washington Post’s Peter Wallsten capsulizes, inadvertently, the supreme paradox of the Obama presidency.

“Obama struggles to balance African America’s hopes with country’s as a whole,” it says.

The story documents Obama’s struggles over the last four years, which continue today, to avoid overplaying his hand as the first black president, yet to also not ignore this fact.

But nowhere does Wallsten note the irony that four years ago many understood the meaning of Obama’s election as the beginning of the end of the perception of black America as a world apart from the...