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In response to:

The Coming Age of Austerity

3rdandgoal Wrote: Nov 06, 2012 11:44 PM
[3] The NIH budget is $30 Billion, and can be classified entirely as health care spending, though it’s often left uncounted. But isn’t research to cure disease health care spending? If it’s not, then what exactly is it? I have also included two-thirds of the FDA budget, as that is the portion related to drug and medical device supervision.
In response to:

The Coming Age of Austerity

3rdandgoal Wrote: Nov 06, 2012 11:43 PM
[2] According to the NHE pdf, other federal, state, and local health programs “Includes maternal and child health, vocational rehabilitation, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Indian Health Service, Office of Economic Opportunity (1965-74), Federal workers’ compensation, and other miscellaneous general hospital and medical programs, public health activities, Department of Defense, Department of Veterans Affairs, and State Children’s Health Program (SCHIP)” and “Includes other public and general assistance, maternal and child health, vocational rehabilitation, public health activities, hospital subsidies, and state phase-down payments.”
In response to:

The Coming Age of Austerity

3rdandgoal Wrote: Nov 06, 2012 11:42 PM
[1] The detailed NHE data split up by source of payment can be found here: In calculating the numbers in the above table, I used Table 1 in the pdf. I allocated all costs associated with Medicare to the public sector, unlike the table in the pdf, which counts Medicare premiums and contributions as private sector payments. From a standpoint of determining government involvement in the health care system, it makes more sense to count all Medicare dollars as public financing, particularly since paying Medicare taxes is precisely how most of the Medicare system is funded!
In response to:

The Coming Age of Austerity

3rdandgoal Wrote: Nov 06, 2012 11:42 PM
With the government already paying for the majority of US health care, one thing is clear about the current health care reform debate: The debate is not about whether the government will take control of the health care system, as that has quietly taken place over the last 40 years. The real debate is about how the government should distribute its health care spending, and on whether it will be able to rein in endless health care cost growth.
In response to:

The Coming Age of Austerity

3rdandgoal Wrote: Nov 06, 2012 11:41 PM
The 2008 data show that 55% of all health care in the United States is publicly financed. The NHE data also show that from 1987 to 2008, the government’s share of health care financing has risen by ten percentage points, or about half a percentage point per year. This means that in 2009, the public share of health care spending is likely at 56%, or perhaps higher as a result of rising unemployment due to the recession. If health care subsidies (primarily tax exemptions) are included as government financing of health care, they add another $200 Billion to the total, raising the government’s share of health care spending to 62%.
In response to:

The Coming Age of Austerity

3rdandgoal Wrote: Nov 06, 2012 11:41 PM
Category---------------------------------Amount (2008 $ Billions) Medicare [1]-------------------------------------------------418 Medicaid (Including State Funding)-------------------340 Other Public Health Programs [2]----------------------189 Federal, State, and Local Employee Health Care--34 NIH and FDA Budgets [3]-------------------------------32 Total Public Spending--------------------------------1113 All Private Health Spending---------------------1018 2008 Total US Health Spending -------------2131
In response to:

The Coming Age of Austerity

3rdandgoal Wrote: Nov 06, 2012 11:40 PM
Of the $2.5 Trillion dollars spent in the United States on health care in 2007, what percentage is paid by taxpayers? The Kaiser Family Foundation calculates that 51% of health care spending was publicly financed in 2008, but this number seems to exclude health care for government employees. The Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services collects data on health care spending in its National Health Expenditure survey, which can be used to perform a direct calculation on the government share of health care financing. The following table summarizes the 2008 NHE data, the latest year for which a detailed breakdown is available:
In response to:

The Coming Age of Austerity

3rdandgoal Wrote: Nov 06, 2012 11:39 PM
Here's a case study showing that the Republican party TOOK OVER health care when they passed Medicare Prescription in 2003. Public, taxpayer-funded health care spending paid for 53% of US health care in 2009. If health care tax breaks are included, this figure rises to 62%. http://truecostblog.com/2009/11/16/what-percentage-of-us-healthcare-is-publicly-financed/
In response to:

Beware of the Lame-Duck Session

3rdandgoal Wrote: Nov 06, 2012 11:20 PM
With the government already paying for the majority of US health care, one thing is clear about the current health care reform debate: The debate is not about whether the government will take control of the health care system, as that has quietly taken place over the last 40 years. The real debate is about how the government should distribute its health care spending, and on whether it will be able to rein in endless health care cost growth.
In response to:

Beware of the Lame-Duck Session

3rdandgoal Wrote: Nov 06, 2012 11:16 PM
test3
In response to:

Beware of the Lame-Duck Session

3rdandgoal Wrote: Nov 06, 2012 11:16 PM
test1
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