In this May 29, 2013 file photo, Pope Francis holds his skull-cap as he leaves at the end of his weekly general audience, in St. Peter's Square, at the Vatican. Since his March 2013 ele

 

              In this May 29, 2013 file photo, Pope Francis holds his skull-cap as he leaves at the end of his weekly general audience, in St. Peter
In this May 29, 2013 file photo, Pope Francis holds his skull-cap as he leaves at the end of his weekly general audience, in St. Peter's Square, at the Vatican. Since his March 2013 election, Pope Francis has started a revolution in the Roman Catholic church that charmed millions and the mainstream media, as he goes about doing what he was elected to do: reform not just the dysfunctional Vatican bureaucracy but the church itself, using his own persona and personal history as a model. But the enthusiasm isn't necessarily shared across the board. Traditionalist Catholics — so coddled by Benedict XVI in his pursuit to reach out to Catholics attached to the old Latin Mass and opposed to the modernizing reforms of the Second Vatican Council — greeted Francis' election with concern and now have had their worst fears realized. Francis has spoken out both publicly and privately against such "restoratist groups" whom he accused of being naval-gazing retrogrades out of touch with the evangelizing mission of the church in the 21st century. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)