In this July 17, 2013 picture, Audrey Schaefer, an undergraduate student studying anthropology at the University of Maryland, excavates beneath a series of tree roots in Easton, Md., as

 

              In this July 17, 2013 picture, Audrey Schaefer, an undergraduate student studying anthropology at the University of Maryland, excavates beneath a series of tree roots in Easton, Md., as
In this July 17, 2013 picture, Audrey Schaefer, an undergraduate student studying anthropology at the University of Maryland, excavates beneath a series of tree roots in Easton, Md., as she and classmates hope to find evidence that might prove the state was home to the first free African-American community in the nation. Archaeologists and students involved in the excavation believe an Easton neighborhood known as The Hill may predate Treme, a New Orleans neighborhood dating to 1812 that is recognized as the nation’s oldest free black community, by two decades or more. The house where the excavation is taking place dates to at least 1793. It was owned in 1800 by a white man named James Price, and was home to three free non-white residents, according to the 1800 Census. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)