In this June 19, 2013, photo, biologist Glenn Stewart in explains the flight pattern of peregrine falcons at home in Santa Cruz, Calif. After decades of scrambling on the underside of C

 

              In this June 19, 2013, photo, biologist Glenn Stewart in explains the flight pattern of peregrine falcons at home in Santa Cruz, Calif. After decades of scrambling on the underside of C
In this June 19, 2013, photo, biologist Glenn Stewart in explains the flight pattern of peregrine falcons at home in Santa Cruz, Calif. After decades of scrambling on the underside of California bridges to pluck endangered peregrine falcon fledglings teetering in ill-placed nests, inseminating female birds and releasing captive-raised chicks, wildlife biologists have been so successful in bringing back the powerful raptors that they now threaten Southern California’s endangered shorebird breeding sites. As a result, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says it will no longer permit high profile peregrine chick rescues from Bay Area bridges, a move which they concede will likely lead to fluffy chicks tumbling into the water below and drowning next spring. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)