FILE - In this June 14, 2007 file photo, supporters for former sex slaves hold photos of the women forced to work in Japanese wartime military brothels across Asia outside Parliament in

 

              FILE - In this June 14, 2007 file photo, supporters for former sex slaves hold photos of the women forced to work in Japanese wartime military brothels across Asia outside Parliament in
FILE - In this June 14, 2007 file photo, supporters for former sex slaves hold photos of the women forced to work in Japanese wartime military brothels across Asia outside Parliament in Tokyo during a protest against Japanese government, demanding compensation and apology. A convincing victory of the July 21 upper house election could embolden Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and his staunch backers within the Liberal Democratic Party to push their nationalist agenda, including laying the groundwork for revising Japan’s pacifist constitution. Abe has called the current history curriculum “self-abusive” and too apologetic to Asian neighbors over Japan’s wartime actions. He needs to tread carefully, however, because any step-up in nationalism would likely exacerbate already tense ties with nearby China and South Korea. Abe has already upset both countries since taking office in December by saying he wants to revise Japan’s landmark 1995 apology for its wartime aggression and questioning the extent to which Korean, Chinese and other Asian women were coerced to provide sex for Japanese soldiers before and during World War II. (AP Photo/Junji Kurokawa, File)