In this June 10, 2013 photo, Andrea Hinojosa, a community organizer with Southeast Georgia Communities Project who has worked with Latino workers for more than 20 years, talks on the ph

 

              In this June 10, 2013 photo, Andrea Hinojosa, a community organizer with Southeast Georgia Communities Project who has worked with Latino workers for more than 20 years, talks on the ph
In this June 10, 2013 photo, Andrea Hinojosa, a community organizer with Southeast Georgia Communities Project who has worked with Latino workers for more than 20 years, talks on the phone in her office in Lyons, Ga. Two years after a handful of Southern states passed laws designed to drive away people living in the country illegally, the landscape looks much as it did before: still heavily populated with foreign workers, many of whom don't have legal authorization to be here. But community activists and farmers say the reality in the area where Georgia’s famed sweet onions are grown is more nuanced. Hinojosa says some migrant families, both legally and illegally in the country, are avoiding Georgia now because they fear discrimination and profiling. (AP Photo/David Goldman)