In this Feb. 10, 2013 photo, Mapuche Indian women prepare lunch during a "Guillatun," a spiritual ceremony organized by Mapuche communities to ask for the well-being of the clan and str

 

              In this Feb. 10, 2013 photo, Mapuche Indian women prepare lunch during a "Guillatun," a spiritual ceremony organized by Mapuche communities to ask for the well-being of the clan and str
In this Feb. 10, 2013 photo, Mapuche Indian women prepare lunch during a "Guillatun," a spiritual ceremony organized by Mapuche communities to ask for the well-being of the clan and strengthen ties, in the Temucuicui Autonoma community, in Ercilla, Chile. The Mapuche ultimately secured treaties with the Chilean state recognizing their land as everything south of the Bio Bio River, or roughly the entire southern half of the long, thin country. But in the late 19th century, a second wave of European settlers arrived, and to make way for them, the treaties were breached in a violent takeover called the “Pacification of the Araucania.” (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)
Tags: Women