FILE - The Aug. 17, 2002 file photo shows Neo-Nazis during a rally in memory of Adolf Hitler's deputy Rudolf Hess in Hess' Bavarian hometown of Wunsiedel, southern Germany. The small to

 

              FILE - The Aug. 17, 2002 file photo shows Neo-Nazis during a rally in memory of Adolf Hitler
FILE - The Aug. 17, 2002 file photo shows Neo-Nazis during a rally in memory of Adolf Hitler's deputy Rudolf Hess in Hess' Bavarian hometown of Wunsiedel, southern Germany. The small town in Germany that was a pilgrimage site for neo-Nazis is now welcoming jobless foreigners with open arms. A dozen Spaniards affected by record unemployment in their home country made their way last year to Wunsiedel on the German-Czech border. The town, nestled in the north Bavarian hills mountains, was best known as the burial place of Adolf Hitler's deputy Rudolf Hess, drawing annual far-right marches until authorities put a stop to them in 2005. Now Wunsiedel has become an example of how Germans and Spaniards can help jobless southern Europeans find work in the north, where low birthrates and continued economic prosperity have created a labor shortage on a continent struggling with recession and unemployment, especially among its youth. Banner reads: "We commemorate Rudolf Hess." (AP Photo/Udo Bartsch)