FILE - In this Dec. 7, 2012, file photo, Utah State basketball player Danny Berger holds a defibrillator, like the one implanted in his chest, following a news conference at Intermount

 

              FILE - In this  Dec. 7, 2012, file photo, Utah State basketball player Danny Berger holds a defibrillator, like the one implanted in his chest, following a news conference at Intermount
FILE - In this Dec. 7, 2012, file photo, Utah State basketball player Danny Berger holds a defibrillator, like the one implanted in his chest, following a news conference at Intermountain Medical Center in Murray, Utah. New research is challenging medical guidelines that say people with a heart-zapping device in their chests should avoid intense sports like basketball and soccer in favor of golf or bowling. Increasingly, teenagers and younger adults receive these implants, people who may be more active and fit but have some underlying heart abnormality that puts them at risk of an arrhythmia. Last year, Utah State forward Danny Berger collapsed on the basketball court, was revived and had a defibrillator implanted; he has said he hopes to play again. (AP Photo/Deseret News, Ravell Call, File)