FILE - In this April 27, 2013 file photo, a Bangladeshi rescue worker searches alone in a building that collapsed Wednesday, April 24, 2013, in Savar, near Dhaka, Bangladesh. The owner

 

              FILE - In this April 27, 2013 file photo, a Bangladeshi rescue worker searches alone in a building that collapsed Wednesday, April 24, 2013, in Savar, near Dhaka, Bangladesh. The owner
FILE - In this April 27, 2013 file photo, a Bangladeshi rescue worker searches alone in a building that collapsed Wednesday, April 24, 2013, in Savar, near Dhaka, Bangladesh. The owner of the building, who ignored inspectors who advised to close the structure when cracks appeared in the building a day before the collapse, sits at the nexus of party politics and the powerful $20 billion garment industry that drives the economy of this deeply impoverished nation. Experts say this intersection of politics and business, combined with a minimum wage of $9.50 a week that has made Bangladesh the go-to nation for many of the world’s largest clothing brands, has created a predictable danger for factory workers. Government officials, labor activists, manufacturers and retailers all called for improved safety standards after a November fire in the same suburb, when locked emergency exits trapped hundreds of garment workers inside amid spreading flames and 112 people died. But almost nothing has changed. (AP Photo/Kevin Frayer, File)