In this April 20, 2013 photo, Miguel Marcano, a private electricity worker, stands behind a fence at his home in Valencia, Venezuela. A dozen voters interviewed across the country, incl

 

              In this April 20, 2013 photo, Miguel Marcano, a private electricity worker, stands behind a fence at his home in Valencia, Venezuela. A dozen voters interviewed across the country, incl
In this April 20, 2013 photo, Miguel Marcano, a private electricity worker, stands behind a fence at his home in Valencia, Venezuela. A dozen voters interviewed across the country, including Marcano, repeated similar explanations for their first opposition vote: anger at food shortages, electrical blackouts, government corruption and inefficiency and a personal dislike for the ruling party presidential candidate Nicolas Maduro, a former foreign minister who talks constantly about late President Hugo Chavez but doesn't share his mentor's charisma, talent for public speaking or long list of projects and proposals for improving Venezuela. Another factor was dissatisfaction over the luxurious lifestyles of high-ranking government officials who drive high-end cars and live in upscale neighborhoods, despite their purported socialist ideas. “Chavez had economic projects, projects to improve production, an education project,” said Marcano. “We never knew much about Maduro. I don't know what he's like as a leader.” (AP Photo/Michael Weissenstein)