In this March 21, 2013 photo, Ana Longo, a researcher with Proyecto Coqui, takes measurements of a Coqui Guajon or Rock Frog (Eleutherodactylus cooki) at a tropical forest in Patillas,

 

              In this March 21, 2013 photo, Ana Longo, a researcher with Proyecto Coqui, takes measurements of a Coqui Guajon or Rock Frog (Eleutherodactylus cooki) at a tropical forest in Patillas,
In this March 21, 2013 photo, Ana Longo, a researcher with Proyecto Coqui, takes measurements of a Coqui Guajon or Rock Frog (Eleutherodactylus cooki) at a tropical forest in Patillas, Puerto Rico. A familiar sound is vanishing from the Caribbean night. The bird-like peeps and chirping of frogs are fainter across the region, a decline scientists say appears to be caused by a combination of climate change, a fungus that has been killing amphibians around the world, and habitat loss. It's a global problem, but worrisome in the Caribbean because the island geography means many species exist nowhere else on earth and the loss of frogs, a principal nocturnal predator of mosquitoes, may have severe consequences for humans. (AP Photo/Ricardo Arduengo)