In this Monday, Feb. 25, 2013 photo, a billboard with working schedules hangs from the wall as Mar Parreno, left, and Mario Perez, two of the founders of the Factoria 5 digital design c

 

              In this Monday, Feb. 25, 2013 photo, a billboard with working schedules hangs from the wall as Mar Parreno, left, and Mario Perez, two of the founders of the Factoria 5 digital design c
In this Monday, Feb. 25, 2013 photo, a billboard with working schedules hangs from the wall as Mar Parreno, left, and Mario Perez, two of the founders of the Factoria 5 digital design company, work in their office in Madrid. In a sparse office measuring just 42-square meters, or 452-square feet, in downtown Madrid, five young Spanish architects who counted themselves among the nation's huge ranks of jobless sit almost elbow-to-elbow in their communal space _ glued to computer screens as they create 3-D animated videos and virtual tours of commercial and residential construction proposals for far-flung sites in Britain, Panama and Malaysia and Zambia. In February, the founders took home 2,000 euros ($2,700) each for the projects they delivered. That's good money for professionals in a field so devastated by Spain's busted building boom that many of the university classmates the Factoria 5 crew graduated with a few years ago are working abroad, unemployed or have given up on the profession. (AP Photo/Daniel Ochoa de Olza)