Muslim Bosniak woman Nusreta Sivac stands at the gate of Omarska, an iron ore mine outside her native town of Prijedor, 250 kms west of Sarajevo on Tuesday, March 5, 2013. During Bosnia

 

              Muslim Bosniak woman Nusreta Sivac stands at the gate of Omarska, an iron ore mine outside her native town of Prijedor, 250 kms west of Sarajevo on Tuesday, March 5, 2013. During Bosnia
Muslim Bosniak woman Nusreta Sivac stands at the gate of Omarska, an iron ore mine outside her native town of Prijedor, 250 kms west of Sarajevo on Tuesday, March 5, 2013. During Bosnia’s 1992-95 war the mine was used by Bosnian Serbs to detain and torture thousands of Muslim Bosniaks, including Sivac. Sivac was held there and systematically raped for over two months. After the war, Sivac begun collecting testimonies of other rape victims with a view to making a UN war crimes court in The Hague recognize it as a war crime. Today, largely because of Sivac, people are regularly prosecuted for wartime sexual violence. Omarska mine is today owned by the world’s largest steel company Acellor Mittal and survivors of the war time atrocities there are not allowed access to the site. According to the UN, between 20,000 to 50,000 Bosnian women were raped , many in special rape camps , during the war that was fought between the new country's Serbs, Croats and Bosniaks. (AP Photo/Amel Emric)