File photo of Peruvian presidential candidate Humala posing during breakfast with children and wife Heredia and his baby, before going to vote in the runoff presidential election, in Lima

 
File photo of Peruvian presidential candidate Humala posing during breakfast with children and wife Heredia and his baby, before going to vote in the runoff presidential election, in Lima
Peruvian presidential candidate Ollanta Humala poses during breakfast with his daughters Nayra (L) and Illaryi (bottom R), his wife Nadine Heredia, and his baby Samin, before going to vote in the runoff presidential election, in Lima in this June 5, 2011 file photo. Heredia's prominent role, which includes serving as a de facto spokeswoman for the government in public and weighing in on a range of policy issues behind the scenes, has made her more popular than Humala - so popular that she is widely viewed as his potential successor. The first lady is arguably the party's only viable candidate after Humala. She could become Peru's first female president if an anti-nepotism rule were struck down to allow her to run for office in 2016. REUTERS/Mariana Bazo