FILE - In this Feb. 9, 2012, file photo, Deputy Defense Undersecretary for Military Personnel Policy Vee Penrod, left, and Principal Director for Military Personnel Policy Maj. Gen. Gar

 

              FILE - In this Feb. 9, 2012, file photo, Deputy Defense Undersecretary for Military Personnel Policy Vee Penrod, left, and Principal Director for Military Personnel Policy Maj. Gen. Gar
FILE - In this Feb. 9, 2012, file photo, Deputy Defense Undersecretary for Military Personnel Policy Vee Penrod, left, and Principal Director for Military Personnel Policy Maj. Gen. Gary Patton, speak at the Pentagon on the results of the department's Women in Service Review. If or when the Pentagon lets women become infantry troops, the country's front-line warfighters, how many women will want to? The answer is probably not many. The Iraq and Afghanistan wars did change the face of combat and highlighted the need for women to play new roles and women already can be assigned to some combat arms jobs such as operating the Patriot missile system or field artillery radar, but offensive front-line fighting jobs will be the hardest nut to crack. Many believe women eventually could be in the infantry, but the Pentagon for years has been moving slowly on that front. (AP Photo Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)