Darrell Moore, left, a skilled tradesman at Ford Motor Company, and Taft Walker, an aviation maintenance worker, both from Crete, Ill., discuss the upcoming re-election campaign of thei

 

              Darrell Moore, left, a skilled tradesman at Ford Motor Company, and Taft Walker, an aviation maintenance worker, both from Crete, Ill., discuss the upcoming re-election campaign of thei
Darrell Moore, left, a skilled tradesman at Ford Motor Company, and Taft Walker, an aviation maintenance worker, both from Crete, Ill., discuss the upcoming re-election campaign of their congressional seat now held by U.S. Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. during lunch Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2012, at a restaurant in Jackson's district in Chicago. With election day just weeks away and the unflattering news about Rep. Jackson reaching a point that would send most politicians into full crisis communications mode, the Jackson camp has maintained the same, often baffling approach to both the media and the voters who could elect him to a ninth term: virtual silence. Walker, 51, said he wanted to be sure Jackson _ the son of a prominent civil rights leader _ isn’t the subject of a “witch hunt.” He didn’t fault Jackson for not speaking publicly, saying there may be a logical explanation for what is an otherwise uncharacteristic response. “Most of the time your attorneys tell you to keep your mouth shut. I think he’s following that,” Walker said. “But him being a Jackson, I bet that’s very hard.” (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)