FILE - In this May 26, 1960 file photo, U.S. Ambassador to the U.N., Henry Cabot Lodge, assisted by Richard F. Pedersen, right, shows the Security Council at U.N. Headquarters a listeni

 

              FILE - In this May 26, 1960 file photo, U.S. Ambassador to the U.N., Henry Cabot Lodge, assisted by Richard F. Pedersen, right, shows the Security Council at U.N. Headquarters a listeni
FILE - In this May 26, 1960 file photo, U.S. Ambassador to the U.N., Henry Cabot Lodge, assisted by Richard F. Pedersen, right, shows the Security Council at U.N. Headquarters a listening device which he said the Soviet authorities planted in the office of U.S. Ambassador Llewellyn Thompson in Moscow. The device, a wooden carving of the Great Seal of the United States, was hollow and contained a hidden microphone. It was presented to Lodge by a group of Russians. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's use of a cartoon-like drawing of a bomb to convey a message over Iran's disputed nuclear program this week, follows in a long and storied tradition of leaders and diplomats using props to make their points at the United Nations. (AP Photo/John Rooney, File)