FILE - In this Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2012 file photo, Sgt. Brandon Morgan, right, kisses his partner Dalan Wells in a helicopter hangar at a Marine base in Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, upon retur

 

              FILE - In this Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2012 file photo, Sgt. Brandon Morgan, right, kisses his partner Dalan Wells in a helicopter hangar at a Marine base in Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, upon retur
FILE - In this Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2012 file photo, Sgt. Brandon Morgan, right, kisses his partner Dalan Wells in a helicopter hangar at a Marine base in Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, upon returning from a six-month deployment to Afghanistan. The photo, made some five months after the repeal of the military's "don't ask don't tell" policy prohibiting gay servicemen from openly acknowledging their sexuality, was among the first showing a gay active duty serviceman in uniform kissing his partner at a homecoming. On Sept. 20, 2011, the repeal of the policy known as "don't ask, don't tell" took effect, enabling gay and lesbian members of the military to serve openly, no longer forced to lie and keep their personal lives under wraps. One year later, the Pentagon says repeal has gone smoothly, with no adverse effect on morale, recruitment or readiness. Some critics persist with complaints that repeal has infringed on service members whose religious faiths condemn homosexuality. Instances of anti-gay harassment have not ended. And activists are frustrated that gay and lesbian military families don't yet enjoy the benefits and services extended to other military families. Yet the clear consensus is that repeal has produced far more joy and relief than dismay and indignation. (AP Photo/David Lewis)