FILE - In this April 10, 2004 file photo, Brig. Mahmood Shah, chief of security for tribal regions, communicates with high officials in his office in Peshawar, Pakistan. In the Pakistan

 

              FILE - In this April 10, 2004 file photo, Brig. Mahmood Shah, chief of security for tribal regions, communicates with high officials in his office in Peshawar, Pakistan. In the Pakistan
FILE - In this April 10, 2004 file photo, Brig. Mahmood Shah, chief of security for tribal regions, communicates with high officials in his office in Peshawar, Pakistan. In the Pakistani tribal regions that harbor al-Qaida and a cauldron of other jihadist groups, militants from Central Asia, China, Turkey and even Germany are growing in number, eclipsing Arabs and possibly raising new challenges not just for the U.S. but for Europe, Russia and China, say intelligence officials, analysts and residents of the area. But stepped-up U.S. drone strikes, Pakistani military offensives and dwindling cash reserves have driven out many of the Arabic-speakers in recent years, says Shah, who is now a retired brigadier and former security official in the tribal regions. (AP Photo/B.K. Bangash, File)