Ja Seung and other Buddhist priests begin bowing as they try to expiate sins of monks involved in a recent scandal in Seoul

 
Ja Seung and other Buddhist priests begin bowing as they try to expiate sins of monks involved in a recent scandal in Seoul
Ja Seung (R), the head of the Jogye order of Korean Buddhism, and other Buddhist priests begin bowing 108 times as they try to expiate the sins of other monks involved in a recent scandal, at Jogye temple in Seoul May 15, 2012. Six leaders from South Korea's biggest Buddhist order have quit after secret video footage showed some supposedly serene monks raising hell, playing high-stakes poker, drinking and smoking. The scandal erupted just days before Koreans observe a national holiday to celebrate the birth of Buddha, the holiest day of the religion's calendar. The head of the Jogye order, which has some 10 million followers, or about a fifth of the population, made a public apology on May 11, 2012, vowing "self-repentance". Ja Seung said he will bow one 109 times every day from Tuesday for 100 days. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji (SOUTH KOREA - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY)