LONDON (Reuters) - Anti-capitalist demonstrators planning London protests ahead of a G8 summit hosted by Britain in June published a map on Friday detailing the location of international banks, hedge funds and other targets where people can "show their anger".

Britain will host the summit of Group of Eight leaders on June 17 and 18 at a golf resort in Northern Ireland, but some protesters have earmarked the British capital for action in the days leading up to the meeting.

"For billionaires, dictators, and other parasites London is a safe place to hide out, launder money, and go shopping," the Stop G8 group said on its website.

"These people are not untouchable. They are right here on our doorstep, and they have names and addresses."

It is not clear how many people the group represents or how large any demonstrations might be, and the focus of the protesters' anger is varied and vague.

But recent demonstrations against government austerity measures have been marred by rioting anarchists, while many Britons angered by bank bailouts and bonuses during tough economic times blame the financial sector.

In 2009, police made more than 100 arrests after protests by tens of thousands of people to coincide with a G20 economic summit in London turned violent.

There were also clashes between anti-globalization demonstrators and riot officers in Scotland when Britain last hosted a meeting of heads of the Group of Eight leading industrialized nations in 2005.

On Thursday, Britain said 3,600 officers from mainland Britain would be sent to Northern Ireland to bolster policing for the G8 summit while security firm G4S will also provide support to deal with any protests and the risk posed by militant Irish nationalists.

Stop G8 said June 11 had been chosen for a "big day of action" in London and it has produced what it describes as a map of "the hiding places of power in the West End."

Among the 100 addresses listed are Israeli, Saudi, Qatari and Greek banks, hedge funds and private equity groups, defense companies and energy firms.

The U.S. embassy, media firms such as Google and Facebook, along with bars and nightclubs the group says are frequented by the rich and powerful are also included.

"Traditionally, carnival is the time where the people take over the streets, the bosses run and hide, and the world gets turned upside down," the group said.

A spokesman for London police said they would have an appropriate and proportionate plan in place to deal with any issues.

(Reporting by Michael Holden; editing by Mike Collett-White)