LJUBLJANA (Reuters) - Slovenia's Constitutional Court on Wednesday rejected referendums on two key reform laws demanded by opposition and unions, a move likely to boost the government's efforts to avoid a bailout.

In October Slovenia passed a law setting up a state firm that would take over bad loans from state-owned banks and enable their sale, and another law for a state holding which would manage all state firms and speed up privatization.

The center-left Positive Slovenia and a union of chemical and rubber industry demanded referendums on the laws, claiming they would lead to non-transparent sale of state firms.

The government asked the Court to ban the referendums, saying the enforcement of the laws was crucial to ensure medium-term financial stability in the euro zone country, which faces a bailout due to rising amount of bad loans and renewed recession.

(Reporting By Marja Novak. Editing by Jeremy Gaunt.)




TOWNHALL MEDIA GROUP