NEW YORK (AP) — Prosecutors at a New York terrorism trial will continue to question a British man who says he was supposed to use a shoe bomb in late 2001 to blow up a plane in a second wave of terrorism aimed at America.

Saajid Badat (SAH'-jeed buh-DAHT') says he backed out of the plot in December 2001 after spending several months training in al-Qaida camps.

Badat is testifying by videotape from London at the trial of Sulaiman Abu Ghaith (SOO'-lay-mahn AH'-boo GAYTH), Osama bin Laden's son-in-law and the al-Qaida spokesman after the Sept. 11 attacks.

Prosecutors are using Badat's testimony to show that Abu Ghaith conspired with others when he promised a storm of airplanes against American would not cease. Testimony continues Tuesday.

Abu Ghaith has pleaded not guilty to conspiracy charges.


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