SANFORD, Fla. (AP) — When Benjamin Crump got his first call from Trayvon Martin's father last month, the attorney counseled patience.It had only been two days since a neighborhood watch volunteer had fatally shot the 17-year-old, and surely an arrest was imminent, thought Crump, who has pursued several civil rights cases against law enforcement agencies.Another day passed. Nothing.Two more days passed. Still nothing.More than a month later, there still has been no arrest.But thanks largely to Crump's efforts, the case has stirred marches and rallies around the nation, merited comment from President Barack Obama, led to the resignation of the Sanford police chief and brought scrutiny from the U.S. Department of Justice into this Orlando suburb of 55,000 residents.

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