FILE - In this Sept. 2, 2011 file photo, demonstrators protest the Keystone XL Pipeline project in front of the White House in Washington. The high-profile anti-pipeline campaign included repeated arrests of activists outside the White House. (AP Photo/Luis M. Alvarez, File) The Associated Press In this Aug. 30, 2011 file photo, actress Daryl Hannah is arrested by U.S. Park Police during a Keystone XL Pipeline protest in front of the White House in Washington. The high-profile anti-pipeline campaign included repeated arrests of activists outside the White House. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File) The Associated Press This Sept. 19, 2011 aerial photo shows a tar sands mine facility near Fort McMurray, in Alberta, Canada. Environmentalists hoping to block a proposed underground oil pipeline that would snake 1,700 miles from Canada to the Gulf of Mexico have pinned their hopes on an unlikely ally _ the conservative state of Nebraska where opposition to Keystone XL pipeline has risen steadily since the project was proposed three years ago. Public hearings will start Sept. 27, in Lincoln on the 16-inch steel pipe that if built would carry oil extracted from tar sands in Alberta, Canada, through Montana, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas and Oklahoma to refineries in Texas. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Jeff McIntosh) The Associated Press This Sept. 19, 2011 aerial photo shows a tar sands tailings pond at a mine facility near Fort McMurray, in Alberta, Canada. Environmentalists hoping to block a proposed underground oil pipeline that would snake 1,700 miles from Canada to the Gulf of Mexico have pinned their hopes on an unlikely ally _ the conservative state of Nebraska where opposition to Keystone XL pipeline has risen steadily since the project was proposed three years ago. Public hearings will start Sept. 27, in Lincoln on the 16-inch steel pipe that if built would carry oil extracted from tar sands in Alberta, Canada, through Montana, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas and Oklahoma to refineries in Texas. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Jeff McIntosh) The Associated Press This Sept. 19, 2011 aerial photo shows a tar sands tailings pond at a mine facility near Fort McMurray, in Alberta, Canada. Environmentalists hoping to block a proposed underground oil pipeline that would snake 1,700 miles from Canada to the Gulf of Mexico have pinned their hopes on an unlikely ally _ the conservative state of Nebraska where opposition to Keystone XL pipeline has risen steadily since the project was proposed three years ago. Public hearings will start Sept. 27, in Lincoln on the 16-inch steel pipe that if built would carry oil extracted from tar sands in Alberta, Canada, through Montana, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas and Oklahoma to refineries in Texas. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Jeff McIntosh) The Associated PressTOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — Environmentalists are lining up in Kansas to tell State Department representatives they oppose the $7 billion Keystone XL pipeline, which would move oil to the Texas coast from Canada.Rabbi Moti Rieber, coordinator of Kansas Interfaith Power & Light, joined the orderly procession of speakers Monday. The religious and environmental group leader called the 1,700-pipeline "a direct threat" to Kansas' natural resources because of possible spills.Gov. Sam Brownback says he supports the pipeline because it would boost national security by giving the U.S. a steady source of oil from a "friendly nation that's next door."Labor union members support the pipeline because of the jobs it would create.The State Department also is holding hearings in Texas, Montana, and elsewhere this week before deciding whether to approve the pipeline.



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