Mylee Wahlgren, 6, left, and her grandmother Donna Sinclair, of Washougal, Wash., bless the 36-foot replica canoe during the canoe reparation ceremony Saturday Sept. 24, 2011, at Fort Columbia, near Chinook, Wash. Back in 1806, explorers Meriwether Lewis and William Clark stole a canoe from native Americans living on the Pacific Coast. More than 200 years later, Clark's descendants are making amends to the Indian's descendants by having a 36-foot replica built for them. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer) The Associated Press William Clark's 8th generation descendants Rick Holton, right, and Anna Haala, 77, ;eft, of Seattle, look on during the canoe reparation ceremony, Saturday Sept. 24, 2011, at Fort Columbia, near Chinook, Wash. Back in 1806, explorers Meriwether Lewis and William Clark stole a canoe from native Americans living on the Pacific Coast. More than 200 years later, Clark's descendants are making amends to the Indian's descendants by having a 36-foot replica built for them. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer) The Associated Press William Clark's descendants Robert, 8, and Greta, 4, Holton, and their grandmother Carlota 'Lotsie' Holton, and Peyton 'Bud' Clark, right, stand in front of their gift, a 36-foot canoe during the canoe reparation ceremony Saturday Sept. 24, 2011, near Chinook, Wash. Back in 1806, explorers Meriwether Lewis and William Clark stole a canoe from native Americans living on the Pacific Coast. More than 200 years later, Clark's descendants are making amends to the Indian's descendants by having a 36-foot replica built for them. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer) The Associated Press This is an undated photo of a portrait of explorers Meriwether Lewis, left, and William Clark. Back in 1806, the explorers stole a canoe from native Americans living on the Pacific Coast. More than 200 years later, William Clark's descendants are making amends to the Indians' descendants by having a 36-foot replica built for them by an Oregon builder of custom wooden boats. (AP Photo) The Associated Press The Honorable Tribal Chairman Ray Gardner, of the Chinook Indian Nation speaks with William Clark's 9th generation descendants Robert, 8, and his sister Greta, 4, Holton, of St. Louis, as they stand in a 36-foot canoe Friday, Sept. 23, 2011, in Long Beach, Wash. Back in 1806, explorers Meriwether Lewis and William Clark stole a canoe from native Americans living on the Pacific Coast. More than 200 years later, Clark's descendants are making amends to the Indian's descendants by having a 36-foot replica built for them. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer) The Associated Press William Clark's descendants Peyton 'Bud' Clark and Carlota 'Lotsie' Holton stand along Waikiki Beach Thursday, Sept. 22, 2011, at Cape Disappointment State Park, near Ilwaco, Wash. Back in 1806, explorers Meriwether Lewis and William Clark stole a canoe from native Americans living on the Pacific Coast. More than 200 years later, Clark's descendants are making amends to the Indian's descendants by having a 36-foot replica built for them. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer) The Associated PressLONG BEACH, Wash. (AP) — It was a long time coming, but the descendants of explorer William Clark have tried to make amends for a 205-year-old theft.A descendant of the explorer in the Corps of Discovery expedition that opened a land route to the West has presented the Chinook Indian Nation with a replica of a canoe that the corps stole in 1806.The five-hour ceremony Saturday included songs, gift exchanges and the maiden voyage of the replica canoe.Some of Clark's descendants and a few friendly donors stepped forward to pay for the canoe, which was custom built in Veneta, Ore.Ray Gardner, the chairman of the Chinook Nation's tribal council, says the presentation of the replica of the canoe is a "good place to being healing."

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