Anti-death penalty supporters comfort each other after hearing that the U.S. Supreme Court rejected a last minute plea of Georgia death row inmate Troy Davis In Jackson, Ga., Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2011. Davis is scheduled to die Wednesday for killing off-duty Savannah officer Mark MacPhail. (AP/Photo Stephen Morton) The Associated Press Minister Lynn Hopkins, left, comforts her partner Carolyn Bond after hearing that the U.S. Supreme Court rejected a last minute plea of Georgia death row inmate Troy Davis In Jackson, Ga., Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2011. Davis was scheduled to be executed on Wednesday for killing off-duty Savannah officer Mark MacPhail. (AP/Photo Stephen Morton) The Associated Press FILE - This Aug. 22, 1991 file photo shows Troy Anthony Davis entering Chatham County Superior Court in Savannah, Ga., during his trial in the shooting death of off-duty police officer Mark MacPhail. Georgia's pardons board on Tuesday, Sept. 20, 2011, rejected clemency for Davis despite high-profile support for his claim that he was wrongly convicted of killing MacPhail in 1989. Davis is set to die on Wednesday, Sept. 21. It is the fourth time in four years his execution has been scheduled by Georgia officials. (AP Photo/The Savannah Morning News, File) The Associated Press Anti-death penalty protester is helped off the ground after hearing about a delay of the execution by the U.S. Supreme Court for Georgia death row inmate Troy Davis In Jackson, Ga., Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2011. Davis was scheduled to die Wednesday for killing off-duty Savannah officer Mark MacPhail. (AP Photo/Stephen Morton) The Associated Press Protesters react as they hear that Troy Davis had filed an eleventh-hour plea asking the U.S. Supreme Court to stop Georgia authorities from executing him for the murder of an off-duty police officer, Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2011 in Atlanta. (AP Photo/Atlanta Journal & Constitution, Curtis Compton) MARIETTA DAILY OUT; GWINNETT DAILY POST OUT The Associated Press Lawrence Soublet, 65, holds a candle and keeps vigil with hundreds of protesters gathered at the Georgia State Capitol to protest against the execution of Troy Anthony Davis, Wednesday Sept. 21, 2011, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/Atlanta Journal & Constitution, Curtis Compton) MARIETTA DAILY OUT; GWINNETT DAILY POST OUT The Associated PressATLANTA (AP) — Capital punishment critics are regrouping after the execution of Georgia inmate Troy Davis, trying to figure out the best way to harness the anti-death penalty sentiment the case created.Helen Butler, executive director of the Atlanta-based Coalition For The Peoples' Agenda, was among a group of about two dozen death penalty opponents who met Thursday night in Atlanta to discuss how they could abolish capital punishment in Georgia. They are a small piece of the hundreds of thousands of people the Davis case attracted, from well-known supporters like the pope and former president Jimmy Carter to those less politically active.Laura Moye of Amnesty International says she expects the Davis execution to be used to rally repeal movements across the country.