In this Aug. 11, 2011 photo, Anthony Gardner, executive director of the New Jersey State Museum, stands with steel from the World Trade Center in Trenton, N.J. According to Gardner, the steel has impact damage from where the two planes hit the towers during the attack. Gardner lost his brother Harvey during the Sept. 11 attacks, which sparked his interest in history, preservation and government. He planned the museum's upcoming Sept. 11 exhibit, which will feature steel and other items collected from ground zero. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez) The Associated Press This Aug. 11, 2011 photo shows Anthony Gardner, executive director of the New Jersey State Museum, in Trenton, N.J. Gardner lost his brother Harvey during the Sept. 11 attacks, which sparked his interest in history, preservation and government. He planned the museum's upcoming Sept. 11 exhibit, which will feature steel and other items collected from ground zero. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez) The Associated Press FILE - In this Wednesday, Sept. 10, 2003 file photo, Diane Horning, right, holds a photo of her son Mathew D. Horning, and Marcee Robertson holds a photo of her son Don Robertson Jr. both of whom were killed in the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks in New York. Family members rallied, calling for the space where the towers stood to remain vacant down to the bedrock. Relatives' willingness to bare their grief and rage has shaped the shadow of Sept. 11. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer) The Associated Press FILE - In this Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2003 file photo, Sally Regenhard, who lost her son, Christian Regenhard, in the attacks on the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001 and is the founder of the Skyscaper Safety Campaign, speaks at a public hearing of the 9/11 Commission at Drew University in Madison, N.J. Relatives' willingness to bare their grief and rage has shaped the shadow of Sept. 11. (AP Photo/Mike Derer) The Associated PressNEW YORK (AP) — For many who lost loved ones on 9/11, being a victim's relative is the emotional equivalent of a full-time job.Family members have become activists on causes including the prosecution of terrorism suspects, rebuilding of the World Trade Center site and national security.Anthony Gardner's brother Harvey was killed on 9/11. He spent years as an activist, leading a push to preserve the twin towers' footprints and developing a Sept. 11 curriculum in schools.Gardner knows about the critics who say that many families haven't moved on, but he says many have learned to turn their grief into something positive.For Gardner, it meant a career change. He moved from corporate communications to a new job heading the New Jersey State Museum. He's planning an exhibit about the attacks' 10th anniversary.