ATLANTA (AP) — More states than ever before have considered school vouchers this year, driven by resurgent Republicans who see the current economy as an opportunity for a fresh push on one of their most contentious education policies.As of mid-July, at least 30 states had introduced bills that would use taxpayer dollars to send children to private schools, most limited to poor or special needs children, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. That's compared with nine voucher bills in 2010, just one of which passed — a special needs voucher program in Oklahoma.And 28 states this year have eyed giving tax breaks to those paying private school tuition bills, which some consider a back-door voucher program.At least six states have passed voucher legislation this year.