In this July 15, 2011 photo, Newport Tent employee Ronnie Edelen uses a gasoline-powered "Ponjaur" hammer to drive the corner stakes for a 40x60 foot wedding tent at Sweet Berry Farm in Middletown, R.I. Small business owners, the backbone of the Rhode Island economy, say burdensome rules and regulations cost them time and money. Now, the state is making a concerted push to do what’s all the rage in Washington, D.C.: regulatory reform. (AP Photo/Stephan Savoia) The Associated Press In this July 15, 2011 photo, from left to right, Michael Dugan, Andy Corcoran and Tripp Taylor of Newport Tent secure the corner post of a 40x60 foot wedding tent at Sweet Berry Farm in Middletown, R.I. Small business owners, the backbone of the Rhode Island economy, say burdensome rules and regulations cost them time and money. Now, the state is making a concerted push to do what’s all the rage in Washington, D.C.: regulatory reform. (AP Photo/Stephan Savoia) The Associated Press In this July 15, 2011 photo, Micahel Dugan lifts a corner post of a 40x60 foot wedding tent being erected by Newport Tent at Sweet Berry Farm in Middletown, R.I. Small business owners, the backbone of the Rhode Island economy, say burdensome rules and regulations cost them time and money. Now, the state is making a concerted push to do what’s all the rage in Washington, D.C.: regulatory reform. (AP Photo/Stephan Savoia) The Associated Press In this July 15, 2011 photo, Damian Woodlyn, an employee of Newport Tent, near right, walks the perimeter of a 40x60 foot wedding tent his crew is erecting at Sweet Berry Farm in Middletown, R.I. Small business owners, the backbone of the Rhode Island economy, say burdensome rules and regulations cost them time and money. Now, the state is making a concerted push to do what’s all the rage in Washington, D.C.: regulatory reform. (AP Photo/Stephan Savoia) The Associated Press In this July 15, 2011 photo, Ronnie Edelen, an employee of Newport Tents, jumps off the truck to begin construction of a wedding tent at Sweet Berry Farms in Middletown, R.I. Small business owners, the backbone of the Rhode Island economy, say burdensome rules and regulations cost them time and money. Now, the state is making a concerted push to do what’s all the rage in Washington, D.C.: regulatory reform. (AP Photo/Stephan Savoia) The Associated PressPROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Officials in Rhode Island are trying to roll back red tape in an effort to jumpstart job creation in the economically troubled state.Keith Stokes, executive director of the Rhode Island Economic Development Corporation, said he has heard a "consistent outcry" from small business owners about the need to streamline the regulatory process.Last year, the General Assembly approved a package of bills aimed at making it easier for firms to do business in the state. And former Gov. Donald Carcieri (kuh-CHEHR'-ee) signed an executive order establishing an office whose aim is to improve regulatory procedures — and help businesses navigate them.One ambulance company from Dartmouth, Mass., that wanted to expand into Rhode Island last year nearly gave up, saying the process had officials' heads spinning.