Gov. Mark Dayton, speaks to the media in St. Paul, Minn. Minnesota Gov. Mark Dayton and top Republicans struck a deal Thursday to end a budget impasse that prompted the state government to shut down, with the Democratic governor giving up on raising taxes. (AP Photo/The Star Tribune, Leslye Davis) MANDATORY CREDIT; ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS OUT; MAGS OUT; TWIN CITIES TV OUT The Associated Press Republican lawmaker, Senate Majority Leader Amy Koch arrives with folder in hand for a meeting with Democratic Gov. Mark Dayton Thursday, July 14, 2011 in St. Paul, Minn., after Dayton sent Republican lawmakers a letter outlining some concessions in an effort to end the Minnesota government shutdown. (AP Photo/Jim Mone) The Associated Press Gov. Mark Dayton appears with GOP leaders Rep. Kurt Zeller, right, and Sen. Amy Koch after they reached a tentative budget agreement in Dayton's office, Thursday, July 14, 2011, in St. Paul, Minn. Minnesota Gov. Mark Dayton and top Republicans struck a deal Thursday to end a budget impasse that prompted the state government to shut down, with the Democratic governor giving up on raising taxes. (AP Photo/The Star Tribune, Leah Millis) MANDATORY CREDIT; ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS OUT; MAGS OUT; TWIN CITIES TV OUT The Associated Press Gov. Mark Dayton appears with GOP leaders Rep. Kurt Zeller, right, and Sen. Amy Koch after they reached a tentative budget agreement in Dayton's office, Thursday, July 14, 2011, in St. Paul, Minn. Minnesota Gov. Mark Dayton and top Republicans struck a deal Thursday to end a budget impasse that prompted the state government to shut down, with the Democratic governor giving up on raising taxes. (AP Photo/The Star Tribune, Leah Millis) MANDATORY CREDIT; ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS OUT; MAGS OUT; TWIN CITIES TV OUT The Associated Press Gov. Mark Dayton appears with GOP leaders Rep. Kurt Zeller, right, and Sen. Amy Koch after they reached a tentative budget agreement in Dayton's office, Thursday, July 14, 2011, in St. Paul, Minn. Minnesota Gov. Mark Dayton and top Republicans struck a deal Thursday to end a budget impasse that prompted the state government to shut down, with the Democratic governor giving up on raising taxes. (AP Photo/The Star Tribune, David Joles) MANDATORY CREDIT; ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS OUT; MAGS OUT; TWIN CITIES TV OUT The Associated Press Gov. Mark Dayton wipes his brow after meeting with GOP leaders Rep. Kurt Zellers, left, and Sen. Amy Koch, Thursday, July 14, 2011, in St. Paul, Minn. Minnesota Gov. Mark Dayton and top Republicans struck a deal Thursday to end a budget impasse that prompted the state government to shut down, with the Democratic governor giving up on raising taxes. (AP Photo/The Star Tribune, David Joles) MANDATORY CREDIT; ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS OUT; MAGS OUT; TWIN CITIES TV OUT The Associated Press Gov. Mark Dayton gets down on a knee to talk to Mark Siegel a state employee and blogger after Dayton appeared at the University of Minnesota's Hubert H. Humphrey School and announced he would seek a budget deal with GOP leaders, Thursday, July 14, 2011, in Minneapolis. Minnesota's Democratic Gov. Mark Dayton offered major concessions Thursday in a bid to end a government shutdown, dropping his pursuit of tax hikes to say he was willing to accept _ with conditions_ a Republican proposal made before the state closed for business two weeks ago. (AP Photo/The Star Tribune, David Joles) MANDATORY CREDIT; ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS OUT; MAGS OUT; TWIN CITIES TV OUT The Associated PressST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — Minnesota's leaders have made a deal that will probably end the nation's longest state government shutdown in a decade, but it only defers their problem to another day.Democratic Gov. Mark Dayton and GOP leaders will rely on delayed aid to schools and selling bonds to turn future tobacco settlement money into cash now. If state lawmakers go along, it will end a shutdown moving into its third week.The shutdown has been painful in Minnesota, but the possible end of it wasn't a relief to everyone.Charlie Kyte heads a group of school administrators who have gotten used to state budgets that delay their aid. Kyte says there will just be another deficit down the road.Democratic Senate leader Tom Bakk (BAHK) says it doesn't solve long-term financial problems.