In a May 31, 2011 photo,Illegal immigrant Georgina Perez takes part in a meeting organizing a rally where illegal immigrant high school students plan to tell their stories and "come out of the shadows" in Atlanta. Perez and other young people hope to draw attention to the plight of the hundreds of thousands of young people who were brought to the U.S. illegally by their parents. (AP Photo/David Goldman) The Associated Press In a May 31, 2011 photo, Illegal immigrants Georgina Perez, left, Adam Kuranishi, second from left, and Dulce Guerrero, third from left, take part in a meeting organizing a rally with activist Mohammad Abdollahi, right, where illegal immigrant high school students plan to tell their stories and "come out of the shadows," in Atlanta. Perez and other young people hope to draw attention to the plight of the hundreds of thousands of young people who were brought to the U.S. illegally by their parents. (AP Photo/David Goldman) The Associated PressATLANTA (AP) — A national movement of young illegal immigrants declaring themselves "undocumented and unafraid" got a boost this week when a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist announced he's been living in the country illegally.The revelation by former Washington Post reporter Jose Antonio Vargas comes as groups of illegal immigrant youth organize rallies, letter-writing campaigns and sit-ins. They want the federal government to relax immigration rules for people were brought to the U.S. illegally as children by their parents.Eighteen-year-old Dulce (DOOL'-say) Guerrero is helping stage a rally next week at the Georgia State Capitol. The recent high school grad and others say it's worth risking deportation to call attention to their cause.