Computer hard drives, from closed criminal cases, sit on a shelf waiting to be wiped of information at the Department of Defense Cyber Crime Center in Linthicum, Thursday, Aug. 11, 2011. Hackers and hostile nations are launching increasingly sophisticated cyberattacks against U.S. defense contractors. And the Pentagon is extending a program to help protect its prime suppliers, while serving as a possible model for other government agencies. Pentagon analysts are investigating a growing number of cases involving the mishandling or removal of classified data from military and corporate systems. Defense officials say intrusions into defense networks are now close to 30 percent of the Pentagon's Cyber Crime Center's workload. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen) The Associated Press Jon Beasley, imaging extraction technician, updates cell phone capabilities on a scanning device at the Department of Defense Cyber Crime Center in Linthicum, Thursday, Aug. 11, 2011. Hackers and hostile nations are launching increasingly sophisticated cyberattacks against U.S. defense contractors. And the Pentagon is extending a program to help protect its prime suppliers, while serving as a possible model for other government agencies. Pentagon analysts are investigating a growing number of cases involving the mishandling or removal of classified data from military and corporate systems. Defense officials say intrusions into defense networks are now close to 30 percent of the Pentagon's Cyber Crime Center's workload. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen) The Associated Press Computer hard drives, from closed criminal cases, wait to be wiped of information at the Department of Defense Cyber Crime Center in Linthicum, Thursday, Aug. 11, 2011. Hackers and hostile nations are launching increasingly sophisticated cyberattacks against U.S. defense contractors. And the Pentagon is extending a program to help protect its prime suppliers, while serving as a possible model for other government agencies. Pentagon analysts are investigating a growing number of cases involving the mishandling or removal of classified data from military and corporate systems. Defense officials say intrusions into defense networks are now close to 30 percent of the Pentagon's Cyber Crime Center's workload. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen) The Associated Press Computer forensic examiner Gil Moreno works on several hard drives association with a crime, at the Department of Defense Cyber Crime Center in Linthicum, Thursday, Aug. 11, 2011. Hackers and hostile nations are launching increasingly sophisticated cyberattacks against U.S. defense contractors. And the Pentagon is extending a program to help protect its prime suppliers, while serving as a possible model for other government agencies. Pentagon analysts are investigating a growing number of cases involving the mishandling or removal of classified data from military and corporate systems. Defense officials say intrusions into defense networks are now close to 30 percent of the Pentagon's Cyber Crime Center's workload. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen) The Associated Press A computer forensic examiner looks for evidence on hard drives at the Department of Defense Cyber Crime Center in Linthicum, Md., Thursday, Aug. 11, 2011. Hackers and hostile nations are launching increasingly sophisticated cyberattacks against U.S. defense contractors. And the Pentagon is extending a program to help protect its prime suppliers, while serving as a possible model for other government agencies. Pentagon analysts are investigating a growing number of cases involving the mishandling or removal of classified data from military and corporate systems. Defense officials say intrusions into defense networks are now close to 30 percent of the Pentagon's Cyber Crime Center's workload. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen) The Associated Press Computer hard drives, associated with a crime, are loaded into two hard drive arrays, right, which are connected to a Mac Pro computer, left, on a forensic examiner's desk at the Department of Defense Cyber Crime Center in Linthicum, Thursday, Aug. 11, 2011. Hackers and hostile nations are launching increasingly sophisticated cyberattacks against U.S. defense contractors. And the Pentagon is extending a program to help protect its prime suppliers, while serving as a possible model for other government agencies. Pentagon analysts are investigating a growing number of cases involving the mishandling or removal of classified data from military and corporate systems. Defense officials say intrusions into defense networks are now close to 30 percent of the Pentagon's Cyber Crime Center's workload. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen) The Associated Press Computer forensic examiner Brian Coleman works on several hard drives association with a crime, at the Department of Defense Cyber Crime Center in Linthicum, Thursday, Aug. 11, 2011. Hackers and hostile nations are launching increasingly sophisticated cyberattacks against U.S. defense contractors. And the Pentagon is extending a program to help protect its prime suppliers, while serving as a possible model for other government agencies. Pentagon analysts are investigating a growing number of cases involving the mishandling or removal of classified data from military and corporate systems. Defense officials say intrusions into defense networks are now close to 30 percent of the Pentagon's Cyber Crime Center's workload. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen) The Associated PressWASHINGTON (AP) — Hackers and hostile nations are launching increasingly sophisticated cyberattacks against U.S. defense contractors. And the Pentagon is extending a program to help protect its prime suppliers, while serving as a possible model for other government agencies.That program is being evaluated by the Homeland Security Department, as part of a potential effort to extend similar protections to power plants, the electric grid and other critical infrastructure.Pentagon analysts are investigating a growing number of cases involving the mishandling or removal of classified data from military and corporate systems. Defense officials say intrusions into defense networks are now close to 30 percent of the Pentagon's Cyber Crime Center's workload.