Walter Reed Army Medical Center is seen in Washington, Thursday, July 21, 2001. Walter Reed Army Medical Center, the military's flagship hospital where privates to presidents have gone for care for more than a century, is closing its doors.(AP Photo/Luis M. Alvarez) The Associated Press FILE - This file photo provided by the Walter Reed Army Medical Center, shows Major Walter Reed, circa 1875. Walter Reed Army Medical Center, the military's flagship hospital where privates to presidents have gone for care for more than a century, is closing its doors. (AP Photo/Walter Reed Army Medical Center, ho) The Associated Press Sylvia Clemmons, front, and Alice Giles, back, walk through the main lobby at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, Thursday, July 21, 2001. Walter Reed Army Medical Center, the military's flagship hospital where privates to presidents have gone for care for more than a century, is closing its doors.(AP Photo/Luis M. Alvarez) The Associated Press U.S. Army Col. Norvell V. Coots gestures during an interview in the main lobby of the Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, Thursday, July 21, 2001. Walter Reed Army Medical Center, the military's flagship hospital where privates to presidents have gone for care for more than a century, is closing its doors. Hundreds of thousands of the nation's war wounded from World War I to today have received treatment at Walter Reed, including 18,000 troops who served in Iraq and Afghanistan. (AP Photo/Luis M. Alvarez) The Associated Press FILE - In this August 1960 file photo provided by Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Presidential candidate Richard M. Nixon is visited at Walter Reed Army Medical Center by Vice Presidential candidate Sen. Lyndon Johnson, Senator John Kennedy's running mate, and Senator Everett Dirksen. Nixon spent two weeks at Walter Reed recovering from a bacterial staph infection. (AP Photo/Walter Reed Army Medical Center, ho) The Associated Press Marine Sgt. Rob Jones, 25, of Lovettsville, Va., listens to a question during an interview with The Associated Press at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, Thursday, July 21, 2011. Walter Reed Army Medical Center, the military's flagship hospital where privates to presidents have gone for care for more than a century, is closing its doors. Hundreds of thousands of the nation's war wounded from World War I to today have received treatment at Walter Reed, including 18,000 troops who served in Iraq and Afghanistan. (AP Photo/Luis M. Alvarez) The Associated Press Artificial legs are seen at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, Thursday, July 21, 2001. Walter Reed Army Medical Center, the military's flagship hospital where privates to presidents have gone for care for more than a century, is closing its doors. Hundreds of thousands of the nation's war wounded from World War I to today have received treatment at Walter Reed, including 18,000 troops who served in Iraq and Afghanistan.(AP Photo/Luis M. Alvarez) The Associated Press The new hospital building at Walter Reed Army Medical Center is seen in Washington, Thursday, July 21, 2001. Walter Reed Army Medical Center, the military's flagship hospital where privates to presidents have gone for care for more than a century, is closing its doors. Hundreds of thousands of the nation's war wounded from World War I to today have received treatment at Walter Reed, including 18,000 troops who served in Iraq and Afghanistan. (AP Photo/Luis M. Alvarez) The Associated Press Gen. John Joseph Pershing's room is seen at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, Thursday, July 21, 2001. Walter Reed Army Medical Center, the military's flagship hospital where privates to presidents have gone for care for more than a century, is closing its doors. Hundreds of thousands of the nation's war wounded from World War I to today have received treatment at Walter Reed, including 18,000 troops who served in Iraq and Afghanistan. (AP Photo/Luis M. Alvarez) The Associated Press A banner is seen at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, Thursday, July 21, 2001. Walter Reed Army Medical Center, the military's flagship hospital where privates to presidents have gone for care for more than a century, is closing its doors. Hundreds of thousands of the nation's war wounded from World War I to today have received treatment at Walter Reed, including 18,000 troops who served in Iraq and Afghanistan. (AP Photo/Luis M. Alvarez) The Associated Press A soldier is seen on the third floor at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, Thursday, July 21, 2001. Walter Reed Army Medical Center, the military's flagship hospital where privates to presidents have gone for care for more than a century, is closing its doors. Hundreds of thousands of the nation's war wounded from World War I to today have received treatment at Walter Reed, including 18,000 troops who served in Iraq and Afghanistan. (AP Photo/Luis M. Alvarez) The Associated PressWASHINGTON (AP) — The closing of Walter Reed Army Medical Center was described as bittersweet Wednesday as staff members and patients gathered on the hospital's parade grounds in Washington to mark the closing of the Army's flagship hospital after more than a century of providing care.The hospital's operations are being moved in August to the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., and to Fort Belvoir, Va. The hospital in Bethesda will be called the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center.Walter Reed opened in 1909. It has treated military members, their families and presidents. It was scarred by a 2007 scandal about substandard living conditions on its grounds for wounded troops in outpatient care that led to changes in how the military treats the wounded.



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