AUSTIN (Reuters) - Texas Governor Rick Perry said on Tuesday that running for the Presidency was not on his radar six weeks ago but now he's "giving it the appropriate thought process."

The conservative Republican governor's comments in an interview on Fox News came the same day he is scheduled to speak at a GOP dinner in New York and two days after he addressed an anti-abortion rally in Los Angeles.

When asked what had changed in six weeks, Perry mentioned Texas First Lady Anita Perry.

"It was a number of conversations that were had with people I trust, including my wife, that basically said, 'Listen, our country is in trouble and you need to give this a second thought,'" Perry said.

He said he was sorting through the physical and mental costs of running in 2012 and what it would mean for his family, though he didn't indicate when he would decide.

"I hate to be pointing to a time specific, even if we decide to get in," he said.

When asked why he has received criticism in the Lone Star State, Perry responded: "A prophet is generally not loved in their home town."

Perry, a critic of President Barack Obama's administration and the author of a book on states' rights, is the longest-serving governor in Texas history.

He was an early supporter of the low-tax, limited-government Tea Party movement. Political analysts have said he would bring strong credentials as a fiscal and social conservative to the race for the Republican nomination.

(Reporting by Corrie MacLaggan. Editing by Peter Bohan)