AP-GfK Poll: Medicare doesn't have to be cut

AP News

5/23/2011 3:29:52 AM - AP News
Nicholas Read poses for a photo at the University at Buffalo South Campus where he once taught as a graduate assistant in Buffalo, N.Y., Thursday, May 19, 2011. They're not buying it. Most Americans say they don't believe Medicare has to be cut to balance the federal budget, and ditto for Social Security, a new poll shows. "I’m pretty confident Medicare will be there, because there would be a rebellion among voters," said Read. "Republicans only got a hint of that this year. They got burned. They touched the hot stove." (AP Photo/David Duprey) The Associated Press Nicholas Read poses for a photo at the University at Buffalo South Campus where he once taught as a graduate assistant in Buffalo, N.Y., Thursday, May 19, 2011. They're not buying it. Most Americans say they don't believe Medicare has to be cut to balance the federal budget, and ditto for Social Security, a new poll shows. "I’m pretty confident Medicare will be there, because there would be a rebellion among voters," said Read. "Republicans only got a hint of that this year. They got burned. They touched the hot stove." (AP Photo/David Duprey) The Associated PressWASHINGTON (AP) — A new poll shows most Americans don't believe Medicare and Social Security have to be cut to balance the federal budget.The Associated Press-GfK poll shows that arguments for overhauling middle-class benefit programs to pare government debt have failed to sway the public.In the poll, 54 percent said it's possible to balance the budget without cutting Medicare, and 59 percent said the same about Social Security. Democrats and political independents were far more likely than Republicans to say that neither program will have to be cut.Overall, 70 percent said Social Security is "extremely" or "very" important to their financial security in retirement, and 72 percent said so for Medicare.The debate about retirement programs is unlikely to be resolved before next year's elections.