Newark Mayor Cory Booker leaps from the wheel cover of a mobile billboard after taking photos on it during part of the FixGunChecks.org Truck tour stop, Wednesday, Feb. 16, 2011, in Newark, N.J. The truck will be driven across the nation as part of the Mayors Against Illegal Guns which was launched by New York City Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg Wednesday. Its purpose will be to draw public attention to the deadly problems in the nation’s gun background check system. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez) The Associated Press The shadow of Newark Mayor Cory Booker is seen on a mobile billboard during a FixGunChecks.org Truck tour stop, Wednesday, Feb. 16, 2011, in Newark, N.J. The truck will be driven across the nation as part of the Mayors Against Illegal Guns which was launched by New York City Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg Wednesday. Its purpose will be to draw public attention to the deadly problems in the nation’s gun background check system. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez) The Associated PressATLANTA (AP) — Records obtained by The Associated Press show more than half the states are not complying with a post-Virginia Tech law that requires them to share the names of mentally ill people with the national background-check system.The deadline for complying with the three-year-old law was last month. But nine states haven't supplied any names to the database. Seventeen others have sent in fewer than 25.That means gun dealers around the U.S. could be running names of would-be buyers against a woefully incomplete list.Officials blame privacy laws, antiquated record-keeping and a severe lack of funding for the gap the AP found through public records requests.



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