William Perry Pendley

Posted August 01, 2007

On April 5, 2005, the University of California at Santa Cruz (UCSC) hosted a job fair for students seeking to learn about post-graduate employment opportunities. After what one reporter called “an hour of chaos and tension,” during which the job fair came to a halt, UCSC officials asked the military recruiters to leave and advised protesters that they could distribute their anti-military literature.

Posted June 30, 2007

In Wilkie v. Robbins, one of the final cases decided by the U.S. Supreme Court at the end of its term last month, one of the facts—in a case bursting at the seams with facts—on which all could agree was that a career bureaucrat was so offended by the conduct of his fellow employees that he retired.

Posted June 01, 2007

Richard and Shauna Kidman operate RD’s Drive In and Exxon in Page, Arizona, and have for more than three decades. In 2000, much to their horror, they discovered that some of their employees, most of whom are Navajo from the nearby Navajo Nation, were sexually harassing fellow employees in the Navajo language. It was not just the female employees who objected to what was being said in the kitchen; many of the Kidmans’ customers had heard that offensive language as well and had stopped patronizing the restaurant.

Posted May 01, 2007

Last January, the House of Representatives passed H.R. 6, the “CLEAN (Creating Long-term Energy Alternatives for the Nation) Energy Act of 2007,” which includes: the “Ending Subsidies for Big Oil Act of 2007,” the “Royalty Relief for American Consumers Act of 2007,” and an untitled section, under which revenues generated by Sections I and II will be spent on yet-to-be-determined “alternative” energy sources.

Posted March 30, 2007

In May 1945, the United States asked Jesse Fox Cannon of Toole County, Utah, to sign a "Construction, Survey & Exploration Permit" to allow the Army upon 1,425 acres of mining claims Jesse Fox Cannon owned near the Army Dugway Proving Grounds in west-central Utah. Jesse Fox Cannon agreed; after all, a war was on; plus, the Army promised that, within 60 days of finishing, it would "leave the property in as good condition as it is on the date of the government's entry."

Posted March 01, 2007

On March 19, 2007, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in Wilkie v. Robbins, a case from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit in Denver, Colorado, regarding whether federal bureaucrats are liable for violating a citizen’s constitutional rights.

Posted February 01, 2007

On February 5, in a case that may reach the U.S. Supreme Court, a three- to four-week trial begins in Casper, Wyoming. The American Civil Liberties Union, on behalf of five American Indians in rural, sparsely populated Fremont County, claims the County violated Section 2 of the federal Voting Rights Act (VRA) because of the alleged inability of American Indians to be elected Commissioner.

Posted December 28, 2006

Next week, former Denver District Attorney Bill Ritter will become Colorado’s 41st Governor. Although Ritter pledged to reform higher education, it remains to be seen if he will provide the assurance sought by a journalism student in Ritter’s University of Denver debate with Congressman Bob Beauprez. Writing in National Review Online, Greg A. Pollowitz reports she asked, “What is the government going to do to make sure I can get a job?” Regrettably, the candidates gave lengthy answers instead of responding simply, “Change your major.”

Posted November 30, 2006

In 1998, ranchers in northern Colorado and southern Wyoming were told by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) that, under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), they had to give up 238,000 acre - feet of water annually to "save" species along the North Platte River in Nebraska. Not that they had anything against the ESA - listed fish and birds, covetous FWS bureaucrats, or downstream Cornhuskers; but, to ensure their economic survival, they needed the water themselves. Their ancestors had long ago put that water to "beneficial use" growing crops and watering livestock; therefore, they had the right to use it in perpetuity. There must be a better way, thought the ranchers.

Posted November 14, 2006

Days ago, in a proposal unnoticed by the media, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) announced the largest land grab since President Clinton designated massive national monuments across the West. When Clinton decreed 1.9 million acres of federal land in Utah as the Grand Staircase -Escalante National Monument to kill a vast underground coal mine that would have employed 1,000 locals in the most economically depressed region of southern Utah, generated $20 million in annual revenue, and produced environmentally - compliant coal for generating electricity, there were protests across the West. When the Bush Administration published its plans, there was barely a ripple of protest.

Posted November 02, 2006

Days ago, in a proposal unnoticed by the media, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) announced the largest land grab since President Clinton designated massive national monuments across the West. When Clinton decreed 1.9 million acres of federal land in Utah as the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument to kill a vast underground coal mine that would have employed 1,000 locals in the most economically depressed region of southern Utah, generated $20 million in annual revenue, and produced environmentally-compliant coal for generating electricity, there were protests across the West. When the Bush Administration published its plans, there was barely a ripple of protest.

Posted October 01, 2006

"When whale oil is gone," Paul Harvey reports an apocryphal American pessimist once proclaimed, "the world will be plunged into darkness."

Posted September 01, 2006

In 1896, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Harlan wrote in Plessy v. Ferguson: "Our Constitution is color-blind, and neither knows nor tolerates classes among citizens. [A]ll citizens are equal before the law."

Posted August 01, 2006

For the last 35 years, Roberts has been barred from hunting on 1,500 acres of deeded land on which he would otherwise have the right to hunt if it did not lie within the Crow Indian Reservation.

Posted July 05, 2006

Colorado is concerned about public health only if the smoking ban does not cost the state money.

Posted May 31, 2006

In 2001, Excelsior Middle School advised a classroom of twelve-year olds that, "for the next three weeks], you and your classmates will become Muslims."

Posted May 01, 2006

After the Ninth Circuit ruled against him, Morris asked the U.S. Supreme Court to hear his case to decide whether its Adarand ruling and its bar against unconstitutional acts by Congress applies to American Indians.

Posted February 27, 2006

South Dakota politicians may have saved an unconstitutional statute and the hunting revenue they covet, but South Dakotans will pay in the lawlessness that may result.